Personality

Hagan, Courtney, Jordan Carpenter, Lyle Ungar, and Daniel Preoţiuc-Pietro. "Personality Profiles of Users Sharing Animal-related Content on Social Media." Anthrozoos (2017). AbstractDraft

Animal preferences are thought to be linked with more salient psychological traits of people and most research examining owner personality as a differentiating factor has obtained mixed results. The rise in usage of social networks offers users a new medium in which users broadcast their preferences and activities, including about animals. In two studies, the first on Facebook status updates and the second on images shared on Twitter, we revisited the link between user Big Five personality traits and animal preference, specifically focusing on cats and dogs. We used automatic content analysis of text and images to unobtrusively measure preference for animals online using large data sets. Results from Study 1 indicated that those who mentioned ownership of a cat (by using the phrase ‘my cat’) in their status updates were more open to experience, introverted, neurotic and less conscientious when compared to the general population, while users mentioning ownership of a dog (by using ‘my dog’) were only less conscientious compared to the rest of the population. Study 2 foundfinds that users who featured either cat or dog images in their tweets are more neurotic, less conscientious and less agreeable than those who do not. In addition, posting images containing cats was specific to users higher in openness, while posting images featuring dogs was associated with users higher in extraversion. These findings taken together align with some previous findings on the relationship between owner personality and animal preference, additionally highlighting some social media specific behaviors.

Preoţiuc-Pietro, Daniel, Jordan Carpenter, and Lyle Ungar. Personality Driven Differences in Paraphrase Preference In Workshop on Natural Language Processing and Computational Social Science (NLP+CSS). ACL, 2017. AbstractPDFSlides

Personality plays a decisive role in how people behave in different scenarios, including online social media. Researchers have used such data to study how personality can be predicted from language use. In this paper, we study phrase choice as a particular stylistic linguistic difference, as opposed to the mostly topical differences identified previously. Building on previous work on demographic preferences, we quantify differences in paraphrase choice from a massive Facebook data set with posts from over 115,000 users. We quantify the predictive power of phrase choice in user profiling and use phrase choice to study psycholinguistic hypotheses. This work is relevant to future applications that aim to personalize text generation to specific personality types.

Guntuku, Sharath Chandra, Weisi Lin, Jordan Carpenter, Wee Keong Ng, Lyle Ungar, and Daniel Preotiuc-Pietro. Studying Personality through the Content of Posted and Liked Images on Twitter In Web Science., 2017. AbstractPDFSlides

Interacting with images through social media has become widespread due to ubiquitous Internet access and multimedia enabled devices. Through images, users generally present their daily activities, preferences or interests. This study aims to identify the way and extent to which personality differences measured as using the Big Five model are related to online image posting and liking. In two experiments, the larger consisting of ~$1.5 million Twitter images both posted and liked by ~4,000 users, we extract interpretable semantic concepts using large-scale image content analysis and analyze differences specific of each personality trait. Predictive results show that image content can predict personality traits, and that there can be significant performance gain by fusing the signal from both posted and liked images.

Preoţiuc-Pietro, Daniel, Jordan Carpenter, Salvatore Giorgi, and Lyle Ungar. Studying the Dark Triad of Personality using Twitter Behavior. CIKM., 2016. AbstractPDF

Research into the darker traits of human nature is growing in interest especially in the context of increased social media usage. This allows users to express themselves to a wider online audience. We study the extent to which the standard model of dark personality – the dark triad – consisting of narcissism, psychopathy and Machiavellianism, is related to observable Twitter behavior such as platform usage, posted text and profile image choice. Our results show that we can map various behaviors to psychological theory and study new aspects related to social media usage. Finally, we build a machine learning algorithm that predicts the dark triad of personality in out-of-sample users with reliable accuracy.

Leqi, Liu, Daniel Preoţiuc-Pietro, Zahra Riahi, Mohsen E. Moghaddam, and Lyle Ungar. Analyzing Personality through Social Media Profile Picture Choice In ICWSM., 2016. AbstractPDFSlides

The content of images users post to their social media is driven in part by personality. In this study, we analyze how Twitter profile images vary with the personality of the users posting them. In our main analysis, we use profile images from over 66,000 users whose personality we estimate based on their tweets. To facilitate interpretability, we focus our analysis on aesthetic and facial features and control for demographic variation in image features and personality. Our results show significant differences in profile picture choice between personality traits, and that these can be harnessed to predict personality traits with robust accuracy. For example, agreeable and conscientious users display more positive emotions in their profile pictures, while users high in openness prefer more aesthetic photos.