Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs

11 hours 11 min ago Special Edition: Evan Millner at Patreon << Laura Gibbs (Bestiaria Latina Blog) I'll have a regular edition of the Bestiaria tomorrow, but I wanted to share here today an email I received from Evan Millner, whose work I have watched and admired for many (MANY) years now. He is using Patreon to support his work, and I am guessing some readers of this blog might be interested in Evan's new home on the Internet. I've pasted in Evan's email below:


For those of you who have not yet heard, on April 14th 2017, Latinum moved to Patreon; https://www.patreon.com/latinum

Following mypodcast.com ceasing trading in 2010, the Latinum Podcast was homeless, and went into hibernation. As you may know, some materials were still available on Payloadz, but I was no longer regularly creating and uploading new materials.

This is all changing!

What is Patreon? Patreon is a type of crowd-funding website, for funding ongoing projects (unlike Kickstarter, which is for big one-off projects).

You can become a patron for $1 or more (you decide) per month; this gives you access to the entirety Latinum's extensive, and growing Latin Streaming Catalogue, which you can find here:
https://www.patreon.com/posts/index-to-latinum-8810343

I have now transferred the bulk of my audio material onto Patreon's site; including material not previously released; there are already regular releases of new recordings.

I have also set up a download catalogue.

For downloads (the kind of download that is also available on Payloadz) there is a higher tier for access to the download catalogue. (This, of course, also gives access to the streaming catalogue).

I am pleased that the number of patrons is growing fast.

If you have not already signed up, would you consider becoming a patron? The funds from my patrons will help me set aside time for working regularly on Latin recording and production; if it goes very well, possibly even as my main activity.

You can find Latinum on Patreon at:
https://www.patreon.com/latinum

Please consider becoming a supporter.

Kind regards,

Evan

13 hours 26 min ago Women under Arrest in a Christian Papyrus Letter << Brice C. Jones
​In a third/fourth century Christian Greek papyrus letter, only the ending of which survives, a group of Christians, probably a church, is writing to another Christian or church about a group of women headed their way. These women appear to be in trouble. They are being transported to an epitropos, a "guardian" or "protector." Typically, guardians of women in Greek documents served as legal representatives who assisted them or acted on their behalf in a court of law. It appears, then, that these women were under arrest.
 
It has been suggested that, based on the dating of this papyrus letter, the correspondence may reflect the circumstances of the Roman emperor Diocletian’s persecution of Christians. If that theory is correct—a fact that is not readily demonstrable—then these may have been Christian women who were possibly about to be imprisoned or severely persecuted, perhaps for not denouncing their faith.
 
Before closing the letter, the writer implores the recipient to give his love (agape) to the women as he would to the “brothers.” Here is a translation of the letter followed by the original Greek text and an image of the actual papyrus (P.Got. 11):
 
“I and those with [me] are greeting [you] in (the name of) the Lord. Just as it is your duty to help all the brothers in the name of our Lord, you shall give your love to these (sisters), too, who are being brought to the epitropos, through whatever you will offer them. I wish that you are well in the (name of the) Lord.”
 
[ -ca.?- ] ἐγώ τε κ̣αὶ ο̣ἱ̣ | σὺν [ἐμοί σε προσ]α̣γορεύομ̣ε̣ν̣ | ἐν κ(υρί)ῳ. καθὼς δέ σοί ἐστιν |  πᾶσι τοῖς ἀδελφοῖς ἐν κ(υρί)ῳ βοηθ[εῖ]ν | καὶ ταύταις ἀγομέναις πρὸς τὸν ἐπίτροπον ἐπιδ\ώσε̣ι̣ς/ [τ]ὴ̣ν ἀγάπην̣ | σου, διʼ ὧν ἐὰν παράσχῃ αὐταῖς. | ἐρρῶσθαί σε εὔχομαι | ἐν κ(υρί)ῳ.
Picture
P.Got. 11
The name “Lord” is abbreviated as a nomen sacrum (“sacred name”), typical of early Christian scribal practice. I think the most interesting part of the request for aid is this statement: “Just as it is your duty to help all the brothers in the name of our Lord, you shall give your love (ἀγάπη) to these (sisters), too.”

​“Agape,” or love, was a Christian virtue that became adopted by the earliest communities of believers. The apostle Paul says in his letter to the Galatians, “through love (διὰ τῆς ἀγάπης) become slaves to one another” (5:13). This kind of agape love became a staple of early Christianity and
 the writer of our papyrus is imploring the recipient to demonstrate his agape to these women in crisis “through what you will offer them.” 

It is not clear what kind of support the author had in mind and we can only wonder what the ultimate fate of these women was. But, as two scholars have suggested, “the crisis of the women will be one opportunity among many for the exercise of such good-will” (Judge and Pickering, 56). Papyrus letters like this one give us much better insights into the social mobility of Christians, with examples of contact with the State, in a time period in which the Christian church was suffering from persecution. 

Further reading:
  1. E.A. Judge and S.R. Pickering, “Papyrus Documentation of Church and Community in Egypt to the Mid-Fourth Century,” JbAC 20 (1977): 47-71.
  2. H.M. Cotton, "The Guardian (ΕΠΙΤΡΟΠΟΣ) of a Woman in the Documents from the Judaea Desert," ZPE 118 (1997): 267-273.
  3. Greek Text:  http://papyri.info/ddbdp/p.got;;11
14 hours 3 min ago Scans Provide a Glimpse of the Homo naledi Brain << Archaeology Magazine

Homo naledi brain scanBLOOMINGTON, INDIANA—According to a report in Science News, Shawn Hurst of Indiana University and Ralph Holloway of Columbia University laser scanned the inside surfaces of severaln partial Homo naledi skulls, and created virtual casts to look for any surviving details of the brain surfaces. They found two grooves and imprints of folds of tissue on a partial Homo naledi skull in an area corresponding to Broca’s area in modern humans, which is linked to language as well as social emotions such as empathy, pride, and shame. Hurst claimed that Homo naledi’s small brain may have had similar capabilities. “We can’t say for sure whether that included language,” Hurst said. Surface features from the back of the Homo naledi brain were preserved on other partial skulls. Holloway said that some of those features are more pronounced on the left side, which in modern humans, is associated with right-handedness. The fossils, recently reoprted to have been dated to between 200,000 and 300,000 years old, were discovered from a deep chamber in South Africa’s Rising Star Cave. For more on Homo naledi, go to “A New Human Relative.”

14 hours 35 min ago Maya Sculpture Uncovered in Southern Mexico << Archaeology Magazine

SUCHIAPA, MEXICO—The International Business Times reports that a piece of a Maya sculpture was discovered under a house on private land in the southern state of Chiapas. The carving is thought to represent the god of maize and abundance, and to date to the late Classic period, between A.D. 600 and 900. The carving has been housed at the Regional Museum of Chiapas. For more, go to “Rituals of Maya Kingship.”

14 hours 47 min ago Genetic Study Reveals Deep History of Dogs << Archaeology Magazine

Peruvian hairless dogBETHESDA, MARYLAND—According to a report in Nature, biologists Heidi Parker and Elaine Ostrander of the National Institutes of Health, and their colleagues, examined the genomes of more than 1,300 dogs to develop a family tree for more than 160 breeds. The study suggests that dogs bred to perform similar functions, such as working or herding breeds, emerged at different times and places. “In retrospect, that makes sense,” Ostrander said. “What qualities you’d want in a dog that herds bison are different from mountain goats, which are different from sheep, and so on,” she explained. Hunter-gatherers are thought to have domesticated canines thousands of years ago and bred them for their skills, while more recent breeders are believed to have selected for physical traits. The study also revealed that most of the breeds in the study originated in Europe and Asia. These types of dogs are thought to have replaced the New World domesticated dogs that crossed the Bering land bridge with the first Americans. The Peruvian hairless dog, and the xoloitzcuintli, however, are clustered together on the family tree. Parker thinks these canines may retain genes from New World ancestors. For more, go to “Denmark’s Bog Dogs.”

15 hours 54 min ago Enkomi Digitisation Project << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)
[First posted in AWOL 28 June 2011. Updated 27 April 2017]

Enkomi Digitisation Project: The Digitisation of the Artefacts of the Enkomi tombs
http://www.enkomicm.org/sites/default/files/acquia_marina_logo.png
The Digitisation of the Artefacts of the Enkomi tombs (British Excavations) in the Cyprus Museum
Dr. Despo Pilides, Curator of Αntiquities, Department of Antiquities, Cyprus

The Project
The idea for the proposal of this assignment was triggered by the corresponding project undertaken by the Greek and Roman Department of the British Museum, which consisted partly of the digitization of the material excavated by the British at Enkomi as part of the Turner Bequest excavations from 1894 to 1896. The Cyprus Museum objects from these excavations and the digitization of this material will provide a link and ultimately unite the two databases, thus reconstituting, to the extent possible, the contents of the tombs.
The proposal was submitted and approved by the Promotion Foundation for Research in 2008. Its duration of 24 months (from January 2009 to December 2010) involved archival research concerning the excavations of one hundred tombs of the Late Bronze Age, of considerable wealth, excavated in 1896 and published in 1900. Two thirds of the objects were transferred to the British Museum as per the terms of the Antiquities Law at the time which allowed the excavator, the owner of the land and the Government a share of one third each of the total number of objects found.  The excavators usually bought the land and were, therefore, granted two thirds of the finds. The Cyprus Museum share was kept in the old premises at Victoria Street. It was then transferred to the new Cyprus Museum, around 1909 and was given new accessory numbers.

The programme is a collaborative effort between the Department of Antiquities, the Open University of Cyprus and the British Museum. Its implementation will ensure the preservation of the collection, it will provide accessibility to objects belonging to the so-called “old collection” in the Cyprus Museum store rooms and consequently facilitate research. Furthermore, it will promote the use and application of statistical and analytical techniques for archaeological data and will give the opportunity to educational institutions to use it as a teaching aid.


Having in mind that Enkomi is located in the occupied part of Cyprus and that the material of the excavations from the site, initiated at the end of the 19th century, is dispersed in different museums of the world, the digitisation of its material is of primary importance. The project may act as a precedent in bringing together dispersed material from the same sites, located in different museums and obstructing a holistic view of those sites. It constitutes the first organised attempt to create a database of antiquities kept in the Cyprus Museum, and the first attempt to transmit data and information through the internet, and via a collaboration between major institutions.
16 hours 14 min ago ITIA data base of ancient Greek hydraulic works << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) [First posted in AWOL 26 July 2013, updated 27 April 2017]

ITIA
http://itia.ntua.gr/static/itia-logo.png
Itia is a research team working on the fields of hydrology, hydrosystems management, hydroinformatics and hydroclimatic stochastics. It consists of 18 members; the team leader is Demetris Koutsoyiannis. The name "Itia" is not an acronym; it is Greek for willow tree. Itia is an open team and has collaborated with colleagues worldwide.
Resources available at Itia include: A data base of ancient hydraulic works 
128 works
Hydrosystem Work Use Construction era Extras

Aegina Aegina cistern Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry

Aitolia Alysia dam Flood Prevention Classical Record has photos Record has external links

Oiniades drainage Land Drainage Hellenistic Record has external links

Stratos drainage Land Drainage Hellenistic

Amorgos Amorgos Lavatory Urban Sewage Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry

Amphipolis Amphipolis aqueduct Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Amphipolis sewage Urban Drainage Classical Record has external links

Athens Athens agora Urban Drainage Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Athens Archaic cisterns Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links

Athens Ceramikos Urban Drainage Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Athens Clepsydra Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Athens Enneakrounos Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links

Athens fountain Urban Water Supply Mycanean Record has external links Record has map entry

Athens Lavatory Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has external links

Athens Peisistratean aqueduct Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links

Athens Roman cisterns Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links

Hadrianean aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links

Heridanos stream control Flood Prevention Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Beotia Boedria Dam Flood Prevention Mycanean Record has external links Record has map entry

Kopais drainage Land Drainage Mycanean Record has external links Record has map entry

Thisbe I Dam Flood Prevention Mycanean

Thisbe II Dam Flood Prevention Mycanean

Cassope Cassope lavatory Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has map entry

Cassope sewers Urban Drainage Classical Record has external links

Corinth Corinth aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Glayki fountain Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links

Perene fountain Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Crete Island Aptera cistern Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Archanes cistern Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry

Chamaizi cistern Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry

Dreros cistern Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links Record has map entry

Hersonisos cistern Urban Water Supply Roman Record has map entry

Lappa aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has map entry

Lato cistern Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry

Liktos aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Palecastro well Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has map entry

Pyrgos cisterns Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links

Cyprus Island Kato Paphos Bathtub Sanitary Facilities Archaic Record has map entry

Kourion cistern Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Nympaeum of Amathus Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links Record has map entry

Salamis aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Delos Delos cisterns Urban Water Supply Mycanean Record has photos Record has map entry

Delos lavatory Urban Drainage Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry

Delos sewer Urban Sewage Hellenistic Record has photos

Delos wells Urban Water Supply Mycanean Record has photos

Inopos cistern Urban Water Supply Mycanean Record has photos Record has external links Record has map entry

Minoa fountain Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has photos Record has external links Record has attachments

Theatre cistern Land Drainage Hellenistic Record has photos Record has attachments Record has map entry

Delphi Kastalia fountain Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links Record has map entry

Dion Dion bathtubs Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has map entry

Dion sewer Urban Drainage Classical Record has external links

Epirus Orraon cistern Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links

Euboea Eretria sewer Urban Drainage Classical Record has map entry

Phechae drainage Land Drainage Hellenistic

Hagia Triada Hagia Triadha sewage Urban Drainage Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links

Hagia Triadha tank Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links

Ithaca Ithaca fountain Urban Water Supply Mycanean Record has map entry

Knossos Knossos aqueduct Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry
Knossos cistern Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry
Knossos lavatory Sanitary Facilities Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links
Knossos sewage Urban Drainage Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links
Knossos WDS Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links
Knossos wells Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links

Kos Kos lavatory Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has map entry
Vourina fountain Urban Water Supply Mycanean

Lesvos Methymna aqueduct Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has map entry
Moria aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has photos Record has external links Record has attachments Record has map entry

Malia Malia aqueduct Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry
Malia cistern Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry
Malia lavatory Sanitary Facilities Minoan-Cycladic

Megara Megara aqueduct Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links Record has map entry
Theagenes fountain Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links

Naxos Island Naxos aqueduct Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links Record has map entry
Naxos fountain Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links
Naxos Tunnel Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has external links

Olympia Kladeos bathtubs Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has external links
Kronion bathtubs Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry
Nymphaio aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry
Olympia drainage Land Drainage Mycanean
Olympia stream control Flood Prevention Classical Record has external links

Olynthus Olynthus aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry
Olynthus lavatory Sanitary Facilities Classical

Peloponnese Epidaurus lavatory Urban Drainage Hellenistic Record has map entry

Mantinea dam Flood Prevention Mycanean Record has map entry

Messene sewer Urban Drainage Hellenistic Record has map entry

Orchomenos dam Flood Prevention Mycanean Record has map entry

Palaiopoli aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has map entry

Patras aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Pheneos dam Flood Prevention Mycanean

Pylos bathtub Sanitary Facilities Mycanean Record has external links

Stympalos dam Flood Prevention Mycanean

Taka dam Flood Prevention Mycanean

Pergamon Demophon - Attalos aqueduct Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links

Madradag aqueduct Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links

Pergamon aqueduct Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry

Pergamon cistern Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links

Phaistos Phaistos cistern Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links Record has map entry

Phaistos lavatory Sanitary Facilities Minoan-Cycladic

Phaistos sewage Urban Drainage Minoan-Cycladic Record has external links

Phaistos tank Urban Water Supply Minoan-Cycladic

Pleurona Pleurona cistern Urban Water Supply Hellenistic

Pleurona Great cistern Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has map entry

Rhode Ialyssos fountain Urban Water Supply Classical Record has external links Record has map entry

Samos Eypalinean aqueduct Urban Water Supply Archaic Record has photos Record has external links Record has map entry

Thera Thera buthtubs Sanitary Facilities Classical Record has external links

Thera cisterns Urban Water Supply Hellenistic Record has external links Record has map entry

Thera lavatory Sanitary Facilities Hellenistic Record has external links

Thera sewer Urban Sewage Minoan-Cycladic

Thessalia Demetriada aqueduct Urban Water Supply Roman Record has external links Record has map entry

Thessaloniki
16 hours 45 min ago Patrimoine du Proche-Orient << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) Patrimoine du Proche-Orient

Diffuser la connaissance sur les sites menacés et attaqués du Proche-Orient pour permettre la poursuite des recherches et donner à voir ce que furent ces civilisations et ces sites universel. 

Lion passant AO21118. Babylone. Musée du Louvre
Il y a 3 000 ans

Babylone (Irak)

Il y a 2 000 ans

Bosra (Syrie)

Le fleuve Euphrate et sa vallée
Il y a 4 000 ans

Harradum (Irak)

Jacques de Morgan
"Conquistador de l'archéologie"

Jacques de Morgan

Il y a 2 500 ans
18 hours 28 min ago In Ancient Peru, Archaeologists Find Rare Spinal Condition And Possible Inbreeding << Kristina Killgrove (Forbes) Nearly one-fifth of all skeletons from an ancient Peruvian cemetery have a rare spine condition. Could it be related to inbreeding?
18 hours 57 min ago Udall Statement on Trump Executive Order Attacking National Monuments << Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

   

Udall Statement on Trump Executive Order Attacking National Monuments 

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

WASHINGTON – Today, U.S. Senator Tom Udall, vice chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs and lead Democrat on the Senate Appropriations subcommittee that oversees funding for the Interior Department, released the following statement on President Trump's executive order directing the Interior Department to review, and possibly reverse, national monument designations. The order affects monuments created after 1996 that are over 100,000 acres, and it would include the Rio Grande del Norte and Organ Mountains Desert Peaks national monuments in New Mexico, as well as the newly created Bears Ears National Monument in Southeastern Utah:
"I do not believe that President Trump has the legal authority to rescind a national monument designation, and if he attempts to do so, I will fight him every step of the way. This executive order is nothing more than a political move that will waste limited resources and unnecessarily add uncertainty for growing businesses and communities around these monuments, including two in New Mexico.
"Our national monuments are treasured by New Mexicans and Americans, hold enormous significance for Tribes, and help fuel an $887 billion outdoor recreation industry that creates and sustains millions of jobs. If Secretary Zinke decides to review Organ Mountains Desert Peaks and Rio Grande del Norte, he will find strong, vibrant monuments that are driving new recreation and tourism-oriented businesses and jobs and that are the pride of the surrounding communities. These monuments are luring thousands of outdoor enthusiasts to New Mexico and invigorating local economies - from retirees and outdoor enthusiasts visiting Las Cruces for OMDP, to tourists drawn to the breathtaking attractions in Taos and the historic Village of Questa, which is hoping to diversify its economy as a gateway to Rio Grande del Norte.
"At Bears Ears National Monument in Utah, Indian Tribes are, for the first time ever, co-managing lands, preserving centuries-old sacred areas that contain troves of antiquities and tell the history of early peoples in the Southwest. Monuments like Grand Staircase, Bears Ears, OMDP and Rio Grande del Norte are huge assets to their communities and the economy in New Mexico, Utah and the Mountain West.
"Today's order represents yet another broken promise from President Trump. On the campaign trail, the president pledged to carry on the conservationist legacy of Teddy Roosevelt. But today he is beginning the process of going where no president before him has: using never-tested and dubious legal authority to try to reverse national monument designations. As a member of the Appropriations and Indian Affairs committees, I will fight to protect and elevate these cherished monuments, and I won't stand by if the Trump administration tries to open the door to selling them off to the highest bidder."

 

 

19 hours 8 min ago Homo naledi’s brain shows humanlike features << Archaeological News on Tumblr A relatively small brain can pack a big evolutionary punch. Consider Homo naledi, a famously...
19 hours 30 min ago Constantine (Deno) and Marie Macricostas and the Macricostas Family Foundation Name West Wing in honor of General Ioannis Makriyiannis << American School of Classical Studies in Athens: News Maria Georgopoulou, Director of the Gennadius Library announces that Constantine (Deno) and Marie Macricostas, through the Macricostas Family Foundation, have pledged a $1.5 million gift in support of the Library’s new west wing. In acknowledgment of this significant gift, the space will be named the “Ioannis Makriyannis Wing” at the wishes of Mr. and Mrs. Macricostas, in honor of the Greek patriot General Makriyannis (1797–1864).
19 hours 40 min ago Long After Their Bones Were Gone, Neanderthals' DNA Survived in a Cave << Archaeological News on Tumblr DNA from two extinct human relatives — the Neanderthals, and a mysterious branch of humanity called...
20 hours 12 min ago Homo naledi Could Be Much Younger Than Previous Thought << Anthropology.net

Homo naledi, the mosaic of archaic and modern human, whose discovery two years ago was published in the journal Elife was touted to be around 3 million years old. New dating evidence places Homo naledi in the 300,000 to 200,000 time period where they could have have overlapped with early examples of our own kind, Homo sapiens.

Homo naledi has much in common with early forms of the genus Homo

Homo naledi has much in common with early forms of the genus Homo – John Hawks

John Hawks, from the University of Wisconsin clarified on the BBC’s Inside Science radio program saying,

“They’re the age of Neanderthals in Europe, they’re the age of Denisovans in Asia, they’re the age of early modern humans in Africa. They’re part of this diversity in the world that’s there as our species was originating…

…”We have no idea what else is out there in Africa for us to find – for me that’s the big message. If this lineage, which looks like it originated two million years ago was still hanging around 200,000 years ago, then maybe that’s not the end of it. We haven’t found the last [Homo naledi], we’ve found one.”

Below are some of anatomical comparisons of modern people with Homo naledi which hark back to features of earlier, archaic humans. Features seen some two million years ago or more.


Filed under: Asides, Audio, Blog Tagged: Homo naledi, human evolution, paleoanthropology
20 hours 15 min ago Gold NecklaceWestern Greekc. 300 BC Gold chain necklace with... << Ancient Peoples

Gold Necklace

Western Greek

c. 300 BC

Gold chain necklace with lion-head terminals. The magnificent lion-heads are made of sheet gold in two halves and the seams can just be traced over the foreheads and under the muzzles. The details are finely chased and blue enamel remains in the eye sockets. There is a double hook and eye fastening (one hook now missing) combined with what might be intended for a snake held in the teeth. The lions’ manes have triple tiers of ruffs with chased details. After a band of beaded, plain and wire rope filigree, the heads join sheet-gold conical collars elaborately decorated with a double chain of small palmettes and small, three-lobed leaves in spiral-beaded filigree. The chain is a massive but simple open loop-in-loop type with beaded wire links with precise butt joints.

Source: British Museum

20 hours 41 min ago Gennadius Library Overseers to Award Gennadius Prize to Lloyd E. Cotsen << American School of Classical Studies in Athens: News The Overseers of the Gennadius Library of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens (ASCSA) will honor Lloyd E. Cotsen, former President of the ASCSA Trustees and the first Chairman of the Overseers, as the second recipient of the Gennadius Prize for “outstanding contributions to the advancement of knowledge of post-antique Greece” at the ASCSA Gala in New York City on May 10, 2017.
21 hours 5 min ago Malcolm Wiener to be Awarded American School’s Athens Prize << American School of Classical Studies in Athens: News The Trustees of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens have named Malcolm Hewitt Wiener, Aegean prehistorian and Chairman Emeritus of the Trustees, as the second recipient of the School’s Athens Prize for “outstanding contributions to the advancement of knowledge of ancient Greece.” Wiener will accept the award on May 10, 2017 at the ASCSA Gala in New York City.
21 hours 19 min ago Soluzioni Epson e smart glass Moverio al Media Art Festival << Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Epson è sponsor tecnico del Media Art Festival, l'evento-progetto della Fondazione Mondo Digitale che si svolge dal 27 al 29 aprile nella prestigiosa cornice del MAXXI, il Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo di Roma.

21 hours 20 min ago Bots of Archaeology: Machines Writing Public Archaeology? << Shawn Graham (Electric Archaeology)

Today was the day for the keynotes for the Public Archaeology Twitter Conference; the main papers unroll tomorrow, so set your Twitters to #PATC and enjoy! This conference I think might well be one of those landmark conferences we discuss in years to come.

For convenience, I’ve copied my keynote tweets below. 


21 hours 22 min ago Ancient Greek Philosohy in Early Modern Europe << AIA Fieldnotes
Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Princeton University Department of Philosophy
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
conference
Start Date: 
Monday, May 15, 2017 to Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Location

Name: 
Anna Faiola- Department Manager
Telephone: 
Right Header: 
Call for Papers: 
no
Right Content: 
21 hours 29 min ago “Works in Progress: New Approaches” Ninth International Graduate Student Conference in Modern Greek Studies << AIA Fieldnotes
Sponsoring Institution/Organization: 
Sponsored by Princeton University Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies
Event Type (you may select more than one): 
conference
Start Date: 
Friday, May 5, 2017

Ninth International Graduate Student Conference in Modern Greek Studies 

Location

Name: 
Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies
Telephone: 
Right Header: 
Call for Papers: 
no
Right Content: 
21 hours 34 min ago On Location with Abraham, Part 1: Shechem << BiblePlaces Blog Post by Seth M. Rodriquez, Ph.D.

"What do those words make you see?" Years ago, I worked as a reading tutor. It was my job to help people decode written words and understand the meaning being communicated through those words. Reading comprehension experts will tell you that the best way to understand and remember what you read is to allow the words to create pictures in your head. As a tutor, I was trained to repeatedly ask the question: "What do those words make you see?"

It is no different when we read the Bible. As we read, we should allow the words on the page to form pictures in our head. Unfortunately, this can sometimes prove to be a challenge. Often we are not familiar with the places and things mentioned in the Bible. How tall was Mount Carmel where Elijah called down fire from heaven? How dry is the Judean Wilderness where David hid from Saul and where Jesus was tempted? What is a horned altar and what did look like?

Fortunately, today we have the means to bridge the gap between our world and the world of the Bible. Collections of images provided through websites such as BiblePlaces.com and LifeintheHolyLand.com can go a long way in helping us to form vivid pictures in our minds of biblical places, characters, and events. To help you on the journey, I am kicking off a new series on this blog called, "On Location." As the name implies, we'll go "on location" with the people in the Bible. We will see some of the same sights they did ... or at least see what these sights look like in modern times. The goal is to help you more accurately visualize the biblical stories.

To get things started, let's talk about Abraham. Abraham's journey started at the east end of the Fertile Crescent in the city of Ur in Mesopotamia. From there, he moved to Haran in the northern part of the Fertile Crescent, and eventually moved to the land of Canaan to the southwest. The story begins in Genesis 12 ...

"Now the Lord said to Abram, 'Go from your country and your kindred and your father’s house to the land that I will show you. And I will make of you a great nation, and I will bless you and make your name great, so that you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and him who dishonors you I will curse, and in you all the families of the earth shall be blessed.' So Abram went, as the Lord had told him, and Lot went with him. Abram was seventy-five years old when he departed from Haran. And Abram took Sarai his wife, and Lot his brother’s son, and all their possessions that they had gathered, and the people that they had acquired in Haran, and they set out to go to the land of Canaan. When they came to the land of Canaan, Abram passed through the land to the place at Shechem, to the oak of Moreh. At that time the Canaanites were in the land. Then the Lord appeared to Abram and said, 'To your offspring I will give this land.' So he built there an altar to the Lord, who had appeared to him. (Genesis 12:1–7, ESV)

What do those words make you see? Let me help you out with the last few verses where Abraham enters Canaan for the first time and arrives at the site of Shechem. 

Shechem (modern Nablus) lies between Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal in the very center of the land of Canaan. However, there is no indication archaeologically or in the biblical text that there was actually a city there in Abraham's day. The city seems to have been founded in about 1900 B.C., about 200 years after Abraham would have passed through here. So to help paint our mental picture, we need to get out of the modern city located at the site of Shechem and see some wide open spaces nearby. In the image below, we are standing a few miles away from Shechem and we can see Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal in the distance. This is similar to what Abraham would have seen back in 2100 B.C.


Mount Gerizim, Shechem, and Mount Ebal from the East

A close-up image of the Shechem area will help us complete our mental picture. The modern city sprawls over the area today. So to help us form a proper image in our minds, it is helpful to dig into one of the historic collections provided through LifeintheHolyLand.com and go back in time. This next image shows what the area between Mount Gerizim and Mount Ebal looked like about 100 years ago. The photographer is standing on Mount Gerizim and looking across the valley. In Abraham's day, this area probably had many more trees than can be seen in the image below (Joshua 14 mentions a forest covering this region) but you can get a feel for what the topography is like through this photograph.


Looking north from Mount Gerizim (photo taken 1910-1920)

According to Genesis 12, this was the place where God spoke to Abraham shortly after he entered the land of Canaan for the first time. This is where He made Abraham the promise, "To your offspring I will give this land." And in response, this is where Abraham built an altar to the Lord.

More images and information about Shechem can be found on the BiblePlaces website here. Historical images of places from Abraham's life can be found on the LifeintheHolyLand website here. The images used in this post were taken from Vol. 2 of the Pictorial Library of Bible Lands (available for purchase here) and Vol. 1 of the American Colony and Eric Matson Collection (available for purchase here).
22 hours 41 min ago Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual Published << Corinthian Matters

Virtually anyone who has participated in the American School Excavations at Corinth has become acquainted with the Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual. I’m not sure who was responsible for writing the first excavation manual for Corinth, or when it first appeared in print, but having an archaeological manual that guides fieldwork and recording is simply good archaeology. It gives workers and students help in making decisions in the field and ensures that excavation occurs in a responsible and systematic manner — producing data scholars can use to understand cultural deposits, buildings, and contexts and the formation processes that have transformed them. In the case of Corinth, a good printed field manual has been a constant guide for the student regular members of the American School of Classical Studies who come to the site every May-June for training.

2005 Excavations

The Corinth manual has grown over the years into a comprehensive and authoritative guide to open-area, stratigraphic excavation, covering everything from excavation of pits, wells, and robbing trenches to the removal of deposits to inventorying objects in the museum. The cohort of graduate students with whom I worked at the Panayia Field back in 2005 frequently referred to the paper versions of the manual in the field until the processes and guidelines became second nature. When I began excavating Hellenistic and Late Roman Cyprus in Cyprus with fellow Corinthian archaeologists in the Pyla-Koutsopetria Archaeological Project, we borrowed and adapted much of the Corinth manual to our excavations.

All this to say that the announcement today of the publication of the manual by The Digital Press of the University of North Dakota is great news. The work, authored by Guy Sanders, Sarah James, and Alicia Carter Johnson, with contributions by Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst, James Herbst, Nicole Anastasatou, and Katerina Ragkou is now available for free download at the the Digital Press website, or you can purchase a print paperback addition for a small cost. The publisher page describes the work in this way:

The Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual is the first major field manual published from an American excavation in Greece and among a very small number of manuals published from the Eastern Mediterranean in the last generation. The appearance of this book is timely, however, as there is a growing interest in field methods and the history of excavation practices throughout the discipline of archaeology. Moreover, Corinth Excavations has long held a special place in American archaeology in Greece as the primary training excavation for graduate students associated with the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. As a result, the field manual has had a particular influence among American excavators and projects in Greece, among Mediterranean archaeologists, and in archaeology classrooms.

And the preface to the manual begins:

This manual describes the present state of archaeological practice at ancient Corinth, Greece. The system employed here has evolved over five decades of excavation and in response to both the nature of the anthropogenic activities and the ultimate goals of the excavation: a diachronic archaeological and cultural history of Corinth. The practicalities of removing archaeological material from the ground, recording it, analyzing it, and storing it for future use have been developed over the past 100-plus years of archaeological exploration, and they are well-suited to the field here, to the post-excavation methods used, and to the facilities available at Corinth.

I see a number of good, concrete benefits in this publication. It puts into (digital) print / final form the comprehensive methods of a major excavation in Greece at this point in time. There’s a tight relationship of course between process and product in archaeology: how you investigate the archaeological record relates in direct way to what you can say about past human activity. Indeed, I wish this new manual included a little historical and reflective overview of how excavation manual has grown and changed over time. Perhaps this could be included in subsequent editions, and I hope this publication might be followed by the publication of subsequent editions reflecting new developments in archaeological procedures.

The work will also be very valuable as a teaching tool. Besides its immediate uses in training American School students in the Corinth Excavations, I could imagine assigning this in my own class in Historical Archaeology. Certainly other professors who teach classical archaeology or archaeological method could use this work alongside other freely available archaeology manuals online (thanks, Bill Caraher!). But the publication could also be made available even in courses in textual fields such as New Testament studies that devote a little time to how archaeology contributes to our understanding of Roman cities. The work is rich in illustrations mostly produced by architect James Herbst. Check out the two below for examples.  

 
The publication of the Corinth Excavations manual marks another positive step toward a more reflexive archaeology that situates contexts, finds, and buildings in concrete contexts and processes of investigation. Congrats to the Corinth crew and the Digital Press in providing access to their work. For more information about the manual, check out Bill Caraher’s press release today.


22 hours 50 min ago New Open Access Book: Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual
CEM_CoverDIGITAL.jpg
The Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual is the first major field manual published from an American excavation in Greece and among a very small number of manuals published from the Eastern Mediterranean in the last generation. The appearance of this book is timely, however, as there is a growing interest in field methods and the history of excavation practices throughout the discipline of archaeology. Moreover, Corinth Excavations has long held a special place in American archaeology in Greece as the primary training excavation for graduate students associated with the American School of Classical Studies at Athens. As a result, the field manual has had a particular influence among American excavators and projects in Greece, among Mediterranean archaeologists, and in archaeology classrooms.
Published as a technical field manual, an archival document, and a key statement of practice from a major excavation, the Corinth Excavations Archaeological Manual presents a guide for daily procedures at the Corinth Excavations, a complete record of documentation forms used in the field, and a practical glimpse into the functioning of a complex, major, project. The manual is a landmark text appropriate for the university student, the scholar of methodology, and the working field archaeologist.
All of the authors have worked on the excavations at Corinth in various capacities. This manual was developed under the directorship of Dr. Guy Sanders by former field directors Alicia Carter Johnson and Dr. Sarah James. Additional contributions come from past and present Corinth staff including assistant director Dr. Ioulia Tzonou-Herbst, architect James Herbst, conservator Nicol Anastasatou, and archaeologist Katerina Ragkou. The authors would also like to recognize the contributions of the many students from the American School of Classical Studies at Athens who offered valuable feedback on earlier versions of this manual over the past 10 years.
Download (free) | Buy | Forms (free) | Media Packet | Other Archaeological Manuals
23 hours 15 min ago The Guennol Stargazer – an iconic work of art from the 3rd millennium BC… and from Turkey << Samuel Hardy (Conflict Antiquities) ‘With its sleek, abstract form and its eyes tilted slightly towards the heavens, this rare complete idol from Anatolia is set to be a highlight of Classic Week in New York.’ But will it be a highlight for the right reasons? Investigative journalist Özgen Acar gave a slightly less star-struck introduction: ‘The “Kilia Idol,” a 23-centimeter […]