Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs

16 hours 31 min ago Cultural Property "Observations" Worth Addressing? << Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

A lobbyist's idea of open discussion of portable antiquities issues:
Mr. Barford is not welcome generally to comment on this blog given the tenor of some of his previous comments as well as much of what appears on his own blog. 
The guy however reluctantly agrees to me posting a single comment "to address Mr. Howland's and Dave Welch's [sic] comments" under his post about Neil Brodie's text on paperless trafficking of Middle Eastern antiquities. If  however you see what the metal detectorist and coin dealer wrote, there really is nothing to discuss there. The kind of personal attack Bailey and Ehrenberg 's cultural property lawyer encourages on his lobbyist's blog (link currently on the legal firm's website) to disguise the lack of proper discussion of the issues really deserves no comment. Pathetic, this behaviour is puerile and pathetic Mr Tompa. That is my comment.

Vignette: Trumpa - the future face of America??

16 hours 37 min ago Transparency and the Demonstration of licitness in the Portable Antiquities Market << Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)
Blogger 
 Cultural Property Observer (attorney Peter Tompa) said...
The problem of course is that Mr. Barford and friends claim that any undocumented artifact is presumptively illicit-- when that is demonstrably untrue for lots of common artifacts in particular.
Then I fail to see what it is these people are pushing against. If it is demonstrable that an artefact is not illicit, then when it is passed on to a new owner documentation of that fact can go with it.  Problem solved.


But then it it fully truthful to claim what Mr Tompa just affirmed? Can the majority of dealers in portable antiquities demonstrate that they have verified that an artefact they have acquired entered the antiquities market and left the source country (as well as entered theirs) by licit channels? Maybe they can set our doubts to rest by from now on providing upfront in their sales offers information on what material they hold which documents their due diligence and can pass on to the purchaser.

18 hours 23 min ago Latin Proverbs and Fables Round-Up: July 28 << Laura Gibbs (Bestiaria Latina Blog) Here is a round-up of today's proverbs and fables - and for previous posts, check out the Bestiaria Latina Blog archives. You can keep up with the latest posts by using the RSS feed, or you might prefer to subscribe by email.

HODIE (Roman Calendar): ante diem quintum Kalendas Augustas.

MYTHS and LEGENDS: The art image for today's legend shows Prometheus Bound; you can also see the legends for the current week listed together here.


TODAY'S MOTTOES and PROVERBS:

TINY MOTTOES: Today's tiny motto is: Passibus aequis (English: At an even pace).

3-WORD PROVERBS: Today's 3-word verb-less proverb is Post acerba prudentior (English: After bitter experiences, more wise)

AUDIO PROVERBS: Today's audio Latin proverb is Sic transit gloria mundi (English: Thus passes the glory of the world). To read a brief essay about this proverb and to listen to the audio, visit the Latin Via Proverbs blog... and see the distich poster below on a similar motif.

PUBLILIUS SYRUS: Today's proverb from Publilius Syrus is: In Venere semper certat dolor et gaudium (English: In Venus/love, grief and joy are always at odds).

ERASMUS' ANIMALS: Today's animal proverb from Erasmus is Plaustrum bovem trahit (English: The cart is pulling the ox; from Adagia 1.7.28... like our "putting the cart before the horse").

BREVISSIMA: The distich poster for today is Aetas Praeterit. Click here for a full-sized view. I'm sharing these with English translations at Google+ now too.


And here are today's proverbial LOLcats:



Nulli inimicus ero.
I will be an enemy to no one.

Respice, adspice, prospice!
Look back, look front, look ahead!

TODAY'S FABLES:

FABULAE FACILES: The fable from the Fabulae Faciles widget is Camelus et Iuppiter, a fable about being careful what you wish for (this fable has a vocabulary list).

MILLE FABULAE: The fable from the Mille Fabulae et Una widget is Verveces et Lanius, a fable for our times.

verveces et lanius

GreekLOLz - and Latin and English, too. Below is one of my GreekLOLz; for the individual Greek, Latin and English versions of the graphic, see the blog post: Ἄλλοτε μητρυιὴ πέλει ἡμέρα, ἄλλοτε μήτηρ. Ipsa dies quandoque parens, quandoque noverca. Sometimes the day is your mother, sometimes your stepmother.


23 hours 11 min ago New Open Access Monograph Series: OrientLab Series Maior << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) OrientLab Series Maior
http://www.orientlab.net/pubs/img/bannerPubs.jpg
OrientLab Series Maior is a peer-reviewed, multi-language series dealing with archaeology, epigraphy and environmental studies, relating to the ancient Near East. This series follows the policy of the open access to scientific data and its volumes can be consulted online, downloaded, or purchased in printed format. 
1 H. Peker Texts from Karkemish, I. Luwian Hieroglyphic Inscriptions from the 2011-2015 Excavations 31/03/2016

2 G. Marchesi Literary Old Sumerian: The Texts 31/05/2016 coming soon

1 day 1 hour ago Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek: Terracottas << David Gill (Looting Matters) Further details are emerging on the Etruscan architectural terracottas that have been returned from the Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen to Italy.

Here is a selection of the architectural terracottas from the return. They are suggestive of material from several Etruscan temples in the region of Cerveteri.

  • HIN 696-703. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 28-29, no. 1 
  • HIN 704. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 38-39, no. 7  
  • HIN 705. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 38, no. 7
  • HIN 706. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 38-39, no. 7  
  • HIN 707. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 38-39, no. 7  
  • HIN 708. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 38-40, no. 7  
  • HIN 709, 710. Revetment plaques. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 116-117, no. 55  
  • HIN 711, 712. Revetment plaques. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 116-117, no. 55  
  • HIN 713-716. Revetment plaques. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 30-31, no. 2  
  • HIN 717-719. Revetment plaques. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 30-31, no. 2 
  • HIN 720-721. Seated sphinx. Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 144-147, no. 69 
  • HIN 722. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 148-149, no. 70  
  • HIN 722. Acroterion base. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. 
  • HIN 722E. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 148-149, no. 70 
  • HIN 722F. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 148-149, no. 70 
  • HIN 723. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 148-149, no. 70 
  • HIN 724. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 152-153, no. 72  
  • HIN 725. Antefix. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 60-61, no. 19  
  • HIN 726. Antefix. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 57, no. 17 
  • HIN 727. Columen plaque. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 169, no. 76  
  • HIN 728. Columen plaque. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 168, no. 76  
  • HIN 729. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 152-153, no. 72 
  • HIN 731. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 148-149, no. 70  
  • HIN 734. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 148-149, no. 70  
  • HIN 737. Acroterion. Cerveteri. Lulof in Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 154-157, no. 73 
  • HIN 738. Columen plaque. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 168, no. 76 
  • HIN 739. Raking simas. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 46, no. 11  
  • HIN 742. Tiles. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p.33, no. 4
  • HIN 743. Tiles. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p.33, no. 4 
  • HIN 744. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 38, no. 7   
  • HIN 745. Painted wall plaques. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 188, no. 83  
  • HIN 746. Raking sima. Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 38, no. 7  
  • HIN 747. Plaques. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 118, no. 56  
  • HIN 750. Painted wall plaque. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 189, no. 84  
  • HIN 751. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 38, no. 7  
  • HIN 752. Painted wall plaque. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 188, no. 83  
  • HIN 753. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 41, no. 7  
  • HIN 754. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 41, no. 7  
  • HIN 755. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 51  
  • HIN 756. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 51  
  • HIN 758. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 51  
  • HIN 759. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 41, no. 7  
  • HIN 768. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 150-151, no. 71  
  • HIN 772. Tiles. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 33, no. 4 
  • HIN 773. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 152-153, no. 72  
  • HIN 775. Acroterion. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 150-151, no. 71  
  • HIN 872. Acroterion. Cerveteri. Lulof in Christiansen & Winter 2010, pp. 154-157, no. 73
  • HIN 873. Raking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 44, no. 9   
  • HIN 874-877. Taking sima. Similar to pieces from Cerveteri. Christiansen & Winter 2010, p. 45, no. 1  





Bookmark and Share so Your Real Friends Know that You Know
1 day 1 hour ago 17th-Century Cheese Found in Baltic Wreck << Archaeological News on Tumblr Divers searching the wreck of an 17th-century Swedish warship on the bed of the Baltic say they have...
1 day 1 hour ago New Open Access Journal: The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture
The Journal of Ancient Egyptian Architecture is a scientific, open access and annual periodical. Its purpose is to promote the publication of research devoted to Ancient Egyptian architecture (domestic, civil, military, ritual/religious and funerary), from the Predynastic Period to the Roman imperial era, whatever the modern geographical context (Egypt, Sudan, Near East, etc). The subject scope includes everything relating to construction, regardless of its original importance or purpose.

The journal publishes fieldwork reports and studies undertaken in the Egyptological tradition, including discussions of epigraphy and iconography, but also work that utilizes specific skills such as structural and materials sciences, or modern investigative techniques. In this way, JAEA seeks to encourage the development of detailed technical descriptions, and deeply theorized understanding (of architectural symbolism, propaganda, climatic and geological influences, etc.). This interdisciplinary approach will help connect adjacent areas of expertise which, alone, could not reflect the richness and complexity of the Ancient Egyptian built heritage.

The periodical welcomes any study that meets any one of these goals, only on the condition that the formatting and content of articles are subject to JAEA scientific publication requirements.

Volume 1

July 2016 - December 2016

The use of the ‘ceremonial’ cubit rod as a measuring tool. An explanation

Fr. Monnier, J.-P. Petit & Chr. Tardy

This article deals with data inscribed on Ancient Egyptian cubit rods, and more specifically on the ceremonial cubit rods. Following a description of their technical and symbolic aspects, the paper reveals a property of the fine subdivisions engraved on the graduated part of these objects, and demonstrates that they could have allowed the cubits to be used as very accurate measuring rulers for architectural drawings and craft works.

Submissions are still open for this issue !

1 day 1 hour ago Index Theologicus: International Bibliography of Theology and Religious Studies << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) Index Theologicus: International Bibliography of Theology and Religious Studies

Dear users of the Index Theologicus

We are pleased to present to you the alpha version of the new IxTheo.

The new IxTheo is a comprehensive bibliography for theology and religious studies. It is now possible to search not only for articles, but also for monographs, databases and relevant Internet links. A selection of review journals is now also included. When the relevant licenses permit it, it is possible to access directly the complete text of the articles, reviews and books.

The new IxTheo remains a free and open access service to the worldwide scholarly community. The editors of the IxTheo are the Universitätsbibliothek Tübingen (library of the university of Tübingen) as well as the Evangelisch-Theologische Fakultät Tübingen (the protestant faculty of theology of the university of Tübingen) and the Katholisch-Theologische Fakultät Tübingen (the catholic faculty of theology of the same university).

We apologize in advance for any errors which might come up at this early stage of development. We wish you an enjoyable experience as you explore the new IxTheo and we would be glad to get your feedback!
1 day 2 hours ago << Archaeology Magazine

Sweden Kronan cheeseKALMAR, SWEDEN—Divers led by Lars Einarsson of the Kalmar County Museum have recovered a diamond ring, gold coins, and a black tin pot containing a thick, gooey substance that may be cheese from the Kronan, the seventeenth-century flagship of the Swedish navy. “It looks a bit like some kind of granular Roquefort cheese. It’s been in the mud, so it’s reasonably well preserved, but at the same time it has been at the bottom of the sea for 340 years,” Einarsson told The Local, Sweden. Scientists will analyze the contents of the pot to try to determine exactly what they are. The Kronan capsized and sank in bad weather during the Battle of Öland in 1676, and was discovered in the Baltic Sea in 1980. Remains of some of the 800 crew members who died in the vessel have been recovered to date, along with more than 20,000 artifacts. To read about the sinking of another great seventeenth-century Swedish ship, go to "History's 10 Greatest Wrecks."

1 day 2 hours ago << Archaeology Magazine

human ancestor cancerJOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA—Osteosarcoma, or bone cancer, has been identified in the toe bone of a human ancestor who lived some 1.7 million years ago. A team of British and South African researchers noticed that the bone, unearthed in Swartkrans Cave in the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site, was not hollow, as it should have been. “So we compared it with modern biopsies of cancer patients and realized it was a malignant tumor,” biological and forensic anthropologist Patrick Randolph-Quinney of the University of Central Lancashire told The Telegraph. He explained that the painful tumor would have affected the individual’s mobility, and thus the ability to survive. A collaborating team of scientists also identified a benign tumor in the vertebrae of Karabo, the two-million-year-old remains of an Australopithecus sediba child discovered at the site of Malapa. “Modern medicine tends to assume that cancers and tumors in humans are diseases caused by modern lifestyles and environments, but our studies show the origins of these diseases occurred in our ancient relatives millions of years before modern industrial societies existed,” explained Edward Odes of the University of the Witswatersrand. To read more about Australopithecus sediba go to "The Human Mosaic."

1 day 2 hours ago << Archaeology Magazine

ZURICH, SWITZERLAND—Previous studies of Neanderthal brain development have suggested that Neanderthal and modern human brains looked similar at birth, but then developed differently. Chirstoph Zollikofer of the University of Zurich and his team generated 3-D casts of the brain cases of 15 Neanderthal skulls ranging in age from newborn to adult. The scientists then compared the images of the Neanderthal brains with patterns of brain development in modern human children. New Scientist reports that at birth, Zollikofer found the Neanderthal brains to be longer, wider, and flatter than modern human brains. He claimed that similar to patterns of modern human development, the cerebellum and other regions of the Neanderthal brains grew quickly during childhood. He also argued that this pattern of development suggests that Neanderthals may have had similar cognitive abilities as well. But some are skeptical of Zollikofer’s results, in part because the bones in newborn skulls are fragile and not fully fused, making it hard to produce accurate measurements. “I think [researchers] should not put cognition on the table every time they find a morphological difference between specimens,” commented Emiliano Bruner of the National Research Center on Human Evolution in Burgos, Spain. 

1 day 2 hours ago More on the Paddler Gods << David Stuart (Maya Decipherment)

by David Stuart (The University of Texas at Austin)

Among the various gods we know from ancient Maya religion, the paired deities known as the Paddlers are among the most important and enigmatic. The two elderly-looking characters are probably best known as the canoe rowers depicted on several incised bones from Burial 116 at Tikal, and they nearly always operate in tandem (Figure 1). One has jaguar-like characteristics and resembles the so-called “Jaguar God of the Underworld” (JGU), whereas the other shows piscine features, as well as a diagnostic stingray-spine stuck through the septum of the nose. I refer to them as the Jaguar Paddler and the Spine Paddler, respectively.

Tikal canoe scene

Figure 1. Drawing on small incised bone from Burial 116 at Tikal, showing the Paddler gods on their mythic canoe. (From Trik 1963:fig.3a).

Paddlers variants

Figure 2. (a) Paddler names from Stela 8 at Dos Pilas (drawing by I. Graham), (b) on an unpublished stucco hieroglyph from Tonina (photo by D. Stuart, 1980)

Hieroglyphs for the two Paddlers were first recognized by Peter Mathews in his important analysis of Dos Pilas, Stela 8. He recognized their portrait glyphs (Figure 2a) embedded within a longer list of god names, perhaps a list of tutelary deities associated with the royal house (Mathews 2001[1977]:399). In the early 1980s I identified an alternate method of writing the Paddlers’ names in a pairing of ak’bal and k’in signs, always in that sequence, each encased in a distinctively-shaped cartouche (Stuart 1988:190) (Figure2b). It was then that I introduced the term “Paddler Gods” as a convenient and neutral term of reference for the pair.  Little has been said or written about these two deities in the years since, and they still remain intriguing figures in Classic Maya myth and ritual performance.

From the Tikal bones we easily gather that the Paddlers were “underworld” figures of great importance, steering the Maize God and his animal companions — a parrot, monkey, iguana and some odd mammal (representing an ancient Maya faunal taxonomy?) — into the depths of the water. A simpler depiction of the same mythological event appears on a polychrome vase, K3033 in Justin Kerr’s database, where the canoe is clearly related to the Maize God’s dressing and “water-entering” (och-ha’) as part of the mythic cycle of his demise and resurrection.

TNA Mon 110

Figure 3. Tonina, Monument 110. Note the Paddlers’ names in block Q. (Drawing by I. Graham)

In ancient inscriptions we read nothing about the Paddlers in connection to the Maize God. Instead they seem to be especially important in Period Ending ceremonies. Monument 110 from Tonina is fairly typical of such references (Figure 3). The disc-altar was once placed before an upright statue of a ruler named K’inich ? K’ahk’ (Ruler 4), serving as a figurative receptacle for offerings on the Period Ending 9.14.10.0.0 5 Ahau 3 Mac (10 October, 721).  The circular inscription notes the dedication of the monument (block J), the king’s scattering rite (K), and the witnessing of the ceremony by two court officials (Mb-O).  The text closes with the verb yatij, perhaps “they bathe it” (P), followed by the names of the Paddlers (Q). Here their “bathing” might be best understood as a type of supernatural blessing or sanction.

Ixlu St 2

Figure 4. Ixlu, Stela 2, showing the Paddlers above a scattering scene. (Drawing by L. Schele).

The same idea seems to be depicted on a handful of late stelae from Tikal and environs, where the Paddlers, sometimes along other gods or ancestors, appear in clouds above scenes of kings casting incense or blood before a circular altar (Figure 4) (Stuart 1988). The connection between god and king could quite personal as well. On Stela 2 from Copan, celebrating the k’atun ending 9.11.0.0.0, Ruler 12 of Copan impersonates not only his distant predecessor on the throne, Tuun K’ab Hix (Ruler 4), but he also is said to embody the two Paddlers, describes as u mam k’uh, “his ancestral gods” (see Stuart 1988:212-214).

Quirigua St C Paddlers

Figure 5. Record of the Paddlers erecting a stone on 13.0.0.0.0, from Quirigua Stela C (drawing by D. Stuart).

The Paddlers’ deep involvement with Period Ending rites build on their documented roles as primordial actors in calendrical ritual.  On Quirigua Stela C, they  play a key role in the famous narrative of the foundational bak’tun-ending 13.0.0.0.0 4 Ahau 8 Cumku, when “thrice the stones were raised.” The first of these dedications was overseen by the Paddlers (Figure 5), establishing their prime importance in setting the mythological example that later kings would follow. It’s maybe relevant that the cyclical movement of time was symbolically encoded in the opposed night-day name of the two gods.

In this note I would like to highlight those handful of cases where we find a third figure mentioned along with the two Paddlers, creating some sort of expanded triadic set. This additional god is represented by another portrait glyph representing a young made deity with an elaborate floral headband and an IK’ sign as its ear spool (Figure 6).  He represents a figure has been discussed by Taube as a Classic counterpart of Paul Schellhas’ “God H” in the codices, and symbolically he seems to be associated with wind, music and the arts (Taube 1992, 2001). One wonders if he might be some vague Maya counterpart to the later Aztec deity Xochipilli, the “Flower Prince,” with similar associations. Just why this flowery wind-man accompanies the Paddlers remains a mystery, but he’s clearly a very important player in the godly sanction of Period Ending ceremonies.

Paddler Triad

Figure 6. The “Paddler Triad,” including the name of an animate wind figure.

As an aside, I should mention that this wind-head hieroglyph can operate as either a god’s name or as the animate form for IK’ (“wind, breath”), as a logogram, as the day sign, or as the patron of the month Mac (Mak). As a name the reading must be different, as indicated by the example from Stela 12 of Piedras Negras where it appears with the suffix –na, indicating a completely different though unknown logographic value (see Figure 6, lower right). In addition, we should take some care not to call this character a wind god, since the Classic Maya had a very different duck-billed character who was explicitly called ik’ huh (“wind god”), no doubt an ancestor to Ehecatl, the wind deity of the Aztecs. The headband character operates quite differently, with strong wind or breath associations nonetheless.

With or without the “wind” figure, the Paddler gods actively oversaw and participated in royal world-renewal ceremonies at Period Endings. Evidently this role perpetuated their far older mythological role as ritual celebrants in primordial time.

References Cited

Mathews, Peter. 1977(2001).  Notes on the Inscriptions on the Back of Dos Pilas Stela 8. In The Decipherment of Ancient Maya Writing, ed. by S. Houston, D. Stuart and O. Chinchilla Mazariegos, pp. 394-415. University of Oklahoma Press, Norman.

Stuart, David. 1988. Blood Symbolism in Maya Iconography. Maya Iconography, ed,. by G. Griffin and E. Benson, pp. 175-221. Princeton University Press, Princeton.

Taube, Karl. 1992. The Major Gods of Ancient Yucatan. Studies in Pre-Columbian Art & Archaeology, 32.  Dumbarton Oaks, Washington, DC.

_________. 2001. The Breath of Life: The Symbolism of Wind in Mesoamerica and the American Southwest. In The Road to Aztlan: Art from a Mythic Homeland, ed. by V.M. Fields and V. Zamuro-Taylor, pp. 102-123. LACMA, Los Angeles.

Trik, Aubrey S. 1963. The Splendid Tomb of Temple I at Tikal, Guatemala. Expedition 6(1). The University Museum, University of Pennsylvania. http://www.penn.museum/sites/expedition/the-splendid-tomb-of-temple-i-at-tikal-guatemala/


1 day 3 hours ago Bronze man and centaur, 11 cm high (4 3/8 inch)Greek, Geometric... << Ancient Peoples

Bronze man and centaur, 11 cm high (4 3/8 inch)

Greek, Geometric period,  mid-8th century B.C.

Half man, half horse, the centaurs were thought to inhabit remote wooded areas. In much of Greek art, they appear in combat with humans and, by implication, are the antithesis of civilized men. The classic rendering of this subject can be seen in the metopes of the Parthenon in Athens. It is, however, already fully presented in this bronze statuette. The outcome of the conflict is indicated by the end of the spear preserved in the centaur’s left flank and by the greater height of the man.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum

1 day 4 hours ago Milestone: five million page views << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online)
At about 8:30 this morning AWOL surpassed five million page views. One million of these have come since mid October 2015.

In the right hand side bar of AWOL is a form allowing you to receive notifications of updates to AWOL by email. This seems useful for those for whom news feeds and their syndications to Facebook and Twitter are not. Your address will be safe. Neither AWOL nor feedburner will send spam. Since I announced this feature in June 2009, 7,714 e-mail addresses have subscribed to AWOL.

If you are reading this in a newsreader or on facebook or twitter (or other social media) you will have to click through to see the form in the sidebar. If you are reading this by email you have already done what's required. The software requires a confirmation of your request to join. If you don't see such a confirmation request, check your spam folder.

Instructions for unsubscribing from the email list are at the bottom of each message from AWOL.

If you are not reading this on on facebook or twitter you are welcome to join in there.

You are invited to visit The AWOL Index
This publication systematically describes ancient-world information resources on the world-wide web. The bibliographic data presented herein has been programmatically extracted from the content of AWOL - The Ancient World Online (ISSN 2156-2253) and formatted in accordance with a structured data model. In continuous operation since 2009, AWOL is a blog authored by Charles E. Jones, Tombros Librarian for Classics and Humanities at the Pattee Library, Penn State University

This publication, The AWOL Index, is an experimental project, developed jointly by Jones and Tom Elliott, the Associate Director for Digital Programs at New York University's Institute for the Study of the Ancient World (ISAW), with the assistance of Pavan Atri, Roger Bagnall, Dawn Gross, Sebastian Heath, Gabriel McKee, Ronak Parpani, David Ratzan, and Kristen Soule.

Creation of The AWOL Index was made possible by a grant from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation.
Finally. Please use the comment function available on each posting if you have something to say. And if you have comments or know of something I should consider including, please contact me directly (cejo at uchicago dot edu) 
1 day 4 hours ago << The Heroic Age CALL FOR PAPERS: 
52nd International Medieval Congress, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo MI (May 11–14, 2017)
Networks of Books and Readers in the Medieval Mediterranean I: Books
Networks of Books and Readers in the Medieval Mediterranean II: Readers
Sessions sponsored by the CU Mediterranean Studies Group/Mediterranean Seminar 
These sessions address the study of networks of books and readers in the Medieval Mediterranean. How did texts and ideas circulate in a Mediterranean context? What types of motifs, topics, and ideas travelled? What books were translated and why? Were there Mediterranean networks of readers who circulated particular texts? These two panels, one focusing on books and the other on readers, seek papers of a comparative, interdisciplinary and/or methodologically innovative nature that focus on how members of various faith and ethnic communities circulated texts and ideas in the broader Mediterranean. 
Contact Núria Silleras-Fernandez at silleras@colorado.edu for further information or to submit a proposal (300-word abstract, one-page CV, and media equipment request by 15 September 2016).

=========================
Núria Silleras-Fernández, PhD
Associate Professor
University of Colorado at Boulder
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
278 UCB
Boulder, CO 80309-0278
USA

office phone: 303-492-5864
fax: 303-492-3699
1 day 5 hours ago Bio-archaeologist studies dental remains to explore the ancient people and culture of Oaxaca's Lower Río Verde Valley << Archaeological News on Tumblr Papyrus molders, stone etchings erode, memories wither and histories are rewritten. Teeth remain....
1 day 6 hours ago Beatrix Potter's archaeological paintings << Joint Library of the Hellenic & Roman Societies / Institute of Classical Studies Library Beatrix Potter was born in London 150 years ago today. Did you know that before she became the celebrated children's author and illustrator, she developed her skills as an artist by making studies of archaeological finds?

 
Her watercolours include Roman and post-Roman finds from the Bucklersbury excavations of 1872-3 (adjacent to Mansion House, City of London), and from Pickle Herring Street in Southwark. The drawings are impressive in their detail and accuracy, as well as beauty, and it is clear to see how these studies helped the young Beatrix Potter develop into the skilled illustrator of Peter Rabbit and so many other beloved characters.

A comparative study of nails, 1895 (Jay; Hall, inside cover image)
 
Roman archaeological finds, including rings, needles, spoons, a chain and a comb. (Barnard p.63)
 

Jay, E; Hall, J, The tale of London past : Beatrix Potter's archaeological paintings, from the Armitt Collection, Ambleside (London, 1990)
http://catalogue.libraries.london.ac.uk/record=b2642384~S7
Barnard, B, 'Before Peter Rabbit' The Independent magazine (1990) 112 pp.62-65
http://catalogue.libraries.london.ac.uk/record=b2493164~S7
1 day 6 hours ago Camera Kalaureia << Bill Caraher (The New Archaeology of the Mediterranean World)

Over the last decade, I’ve been messing around with the relationship between photography and archaeology. As Y. Hamilakis has noted photography and archaeology are “two collateral apparatuses of modernity.” Hamilakis and F. Ifantidis have found new ways to interrogate and reflect on the relationship between photography and archaeology in their new book, Camera Kalaureia (2016). Snippets of ethnographic texts overlay the photographs throughout the short book making clear that the photographs are part of the ethnographic project, and, indeed, the book is called a “Photo-Ethnography.” 

The book uses photography as a way to explore the relationships between the past and the present at the site of Kalaureia on Poros. By consciously recognizing photography as an act and the viewing of the photograph as part of that action, the authors embrace the potential of the photograph as a mediator between the viewer, the photographer, and the objects associated both with photography and the history of the site. In their hands, the modern history of the site – including its carefully planted olive trees, the scarred pine trees from resin collection, the traces of modern tiles and mud brick, and the inscribed graffiti of the landowners – fights for attention with the ancient history of the site and long-robbed out temple of Poseidon. More poignantly, the photographs trace the barriers that define the site – a locked gate, a guard shack, and the red-and-white tape and ropes that cordon off the archaeologists’ trenches –  and their intersection with the movement of visitors, workmen, and archaeologists across the site. 

The photographs are not what we might imagine as conventional “documentary photographs” framed by a kind of “objective” style that focuses the viewer on a point, a person, or an object. Instead the photographs in this book actively drag the viewers eye across panoramas, in and out of focus, and into photos that lack enough contrast to distinguish easily between foreground an background. In fact, some of the most compelling photographs display a relentlessness of focus that prevents the eye from settling comfortably on a point in the photograph. The absence of any place for the eye to rest compels us, first, to become aware of the photographer and the camera, and, then, to probe the photograph for some object, individual, or meaning. 

The text makes clear that the camera’s lens and the photographer are as essential to the landscape as the trees, the fragments of the recent past, the archaeologists, and the antiquities. The situatedness of the photographer, the ethnographic texts, and the photographs push the viewer and reader to recognize the persistent interposition of the present, the modern, and the ancient.

The book is worth a careful exploration and this is made more appealing because it’s a free download! Check out their photoblog as well


1 day 9 hours ago What Motivates People To Start Boring Businesses? << Martin Rundkvist (Aardvarchaeology)
Why?

Why?

I wonder what motivates people to start companies that make or provide boring stuff. What causes a person to devote decades of their life to an organisation that manufactures soap or installs archive shelving? It doesn’t surprise me that people take boring jobs: everybody needs a job and most jobs are boring. But what makes a person suddenly think “What I really want to do with my life is run a squeegee company”?

Maybe what they really think is “I want to make more money and avoid taking orders, and the only business I really know anything about is the squeegee business. I am resigned to the fact that I must spend my life doing boring things. Instead of just working at a factory that makes squeegees, I’m going to start a factory of my own. It’ll be boring and pointless. But I will make more money, and I will have no boss.”

My incomprehension is probably typical of Swedish middle-class culture. I don’t particularly need money, because I despise conspicuous consumption and most of my family’s needs beyond housing and subsistence are covered by the public sector. My kids don’t have trust funds, for instance. Uni tuition is free and state study loans are favourable. My main career priorities are fun, intellectual satisfaction and academic recognition, neither of which a chain of stationery stores would be likely to provide.

1 day 9 hours ago IPOGEOS: consorzio di imprese dell’innovazione e delle nuove tecnologie per i beni culturali << Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Nasce il cluster IPOGEOS, futuro Consorzio di imprese nell’innovazione e delle nuove tecnologie applicate ai beni culturali. Ipogeos è promosso da Materahub, consorzio di imprese che opera nell’ambito della progettazione europea applicata ai settori dell’ICT, della valorizzazione dei Patrimoni Culturali e del turismo culturale.

1 day 9 hours ago Bronze figure of Roman goddess unearthed at Arbeia in South Shields << Archaeological News on Tumblr Volunteers have unearthed a miniature bronze figure of a Roman goddess from Arbeia Roman Fort in...
1 day 10 hours ago Earliest Human Cancer Found in 1.7-Million-Year-Old Bone << Archaeological News on Tumblr In the fossil-rich region of South Africa known as the Cradle of Humankind, scientists have...
1 day 10 hours ago Internationale conferentie over prehistorische vuursteenmijnbouw << ArcheoNet BE

Van 28 september tot 1 oktober organiseert de ‘UISPP Commission on Flint Mining in Pre- and Protohistoric Times’ zijn 7de internationale conferentie in Bergen en Spiennes (Henegouwen). Het colloquium, dat onderzoekers uit heel Europa samenbrengt, heeft als thema ‘Mining and Quarrying. Geological Characterisation, Knapping Processes and Distribution Networks during Pre- and Protohistoric Times’. Het programma en alle praktische informatie vind je op spw.wallonie.be.

1 day 11 hours ago I Have This Book (Here’s How I Got It) << James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix) The above image comes via a post on Jerry Coyne’s blog, “The Truth About Creationism vs. Evolutionism.” Would it be fair to say that the biggest reasons for the debates about evolution among Christians, and between religious fundamentalists of various stripes and everyone else, stem from people not understanding how either of the two books [Read More...]