Maia Atlantis: Ancient World Blogs

8 hours 29 min ago << Archaeology Magazine

Egypt Heliopolis ReliefsCAIRO, EGYPT—Mahmoud Afify, head of the ancient Egyptian antiquities sector at the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities, announced that the Egyptian-German Archaeological Mission to Matariya discovered a sanctuary of Nectanebo I (380-363 B.C.) in the temple precinct of Heliopolis. According to a report in ANSAmed, the building was constructed with limestone reliefs and columns, and had lower wall zones made of black basalt. Aiman Ashmawy, head of the Egyptian team, added that the eastern gate was made of brown silicified sandstone. The team also unearthed a bronze figurine of the goddess Bastet, basalt slabs carved with images of Nile gods and accompanying texts, and sculptor’s practice pieces. To read about animal mummies, go to "Messengers to the Gods."

8 hours 29 min ago << Archaeology Magazine

uss monitor conservationNEWPORT NEWS, VIRGINIA—Conservators at the USS Monitor Center at The Mariners’ Museum have begun to remove the marine concretions from the surfaces of the ship’s gun turret, which has been soaking in a 90,000-gallon treatment tank for five years. The Daily Press reports that the conservators will also remove the metal shields that line the interior of the turret to clean and to look for small artifacts that may have been trapped there when the warship sank. Most of the shields were blown off in battle, “but there are still four or five of them that are mostly intact—all on the starboard side of the turret where most of the artifacts have been found. So we believe there’s a pretty good chance there are more of them waiting to be exposed,” explained senior conservator William N. Hoffman. So far, the team has recovered a bone-handled knife, a silver table spoon, a monkey wrench, a glass tube for a steam engine gauge, and a cartridge for a naval carbine behind the shields. To read more about USS Monitor, go to "History's 10 Greatest Wrecks."

8 hours 29 min ago << Archaeology Magazine

Scotland Orkney chamberHARRAY, ORKNEY—A landowner in Scotland found an intact underground chamber that may date to the Iron Age, according to a report in The Orcadian. “Peering inside the entirely roofed, pristine structure, we could see that, although the site was hitherto unknown to officialdom, it had been discovered previously, in the Victorian period, as the whole of the interior is covered in nineteenth-century rubbish—iron kettles, pots, glass bottles, marmalade jars, and imported French mustard jars!” said Martin Carruthers of the University of Highlands and Islands. Carruthers and county archaeologist Julie Gibson think the trash could provide clues to the life of a local resident in the nineteenth century, but for now, the structure has been closed up and is being monitored.

8 hours 47 min ago thegetty: ancientpeoples: Gold snake bracelet, worn on the... << Ancient Peoples

thegetty:

ancientpeoples:

Gold snake bracelet, worn on the wrist

Romano-Egyptian, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. 

Source: The J. Paul Getty Museum

In the Hellenistic period, gold made available by new territorial conquests flooded the Greek world. 

Combined with social and economic changes that created a wealthy clientele with a taste for luxury, this availability led to an immense outpouring of gold jewelry to meet the demand.

Here’s a closer view of the detailing of the cross-hatching.

9 hours 1 min ago Responsible Hoard Finder, There Are Some << Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

Can you imagine this? Forester Bogusław Szwichtenberg found two pots with medieval silver coins in them last year and they were worth half a million, he handed them over (as the law requires) and was given a treasure reward, fifty thousand and the thanks of the Minister of Culture for his responsible behaviour in not taking the objects to a dealer, but handing them over to a museum. Of course this was not in the UK where Treasure hunters would not dream of accepting anything less than their market value - for otherwise they'd have no problems flogging the stuff off.  But the Polish leiter of the newly-formed "European Council for Metal Detecting" wants to bring British attitudes to the heritage to enrichen the honest detector users of Poland. I'll not wish them luck ('Znaleźli prawdziwe skarby, ale oddali je państwu' [in Polish]).

9 hours 37 min ago Gold snake bracelet, worn on the wristRomano-Egyptian, 3rd -... << Ancient Peoples

Gold snake bracelet, worn on the wrist

Romano-Egyptian, 3rd - 2nd century B.C. 

Source: The J. Paul Getty Museum

10 hours 34 min ago Extracting your Hypothesis Annotations as Structured Notes << Shawn Graham (Electric Archaeology)

I like Hypothes.is. I’ve used it to return feedback to students, and I’m trying to be more mindful about what I read online in that I should annotate the damned stuff and keep everything handy in one locale. Since you can get a stream of your annotations, one way I’ve tried to keep things together is to put the feed on my open notebook. It works, but it ain’t pretty. It’s not particularly useful either  in that part of the point of keeping an open notebook is that I can start crosslinking my notes as I write in atom.

So over on the hypothesis blog I read this account of extracting annotations as structured information. I forked the script, and adapted it to extract some of my annotations from Paul Reilly’s article on additive manufacturing & archaeology. If you’ve got the plugin installed, you’ll be able to see all of my annotations. You’ll notice that some of them have some odd-ish tags. My script looks for these tags: Title, Subject Keytheme, keylit, item (see lines 82 to 86). Each time I use those tags, I have to add a colon, thus Keytheme:1 Keytheme:2 etc. (nb if you don’t differentiate like this you’ll get an error about index length when you run the script). A little further down, the script makes a lovely little table in order to summarize your annotations. To use that part, you structure your annotation itself so that it contains the headers from the table (see line 105 to adapt this to your own needs). Your annotation will look like this:

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 12.53.39 PM

So: note the tag, item:1, and note how I’ve used the headers from the table to organize my thoughts in the annotation. Clearly, these are not useful thoughts on my part, but I’m only concerned with getting the script to work as I have received it. I’ll customize things in due course. Speaking of customization: change up line 43 to point to whatever thing on the web it is you’ve annotated. Finally, the script outputs an html file that’ll look like this:

Screen Shot 2016-05-05 at 12.38.54 PM

Now, given that I have an open notebook that I’m writing in markdown and then using jekyll to stitch together, I’ve changed the last line of the script to save as .md rather than .html, and then I just copy the generated html into one of my notecard templates, like so. The html mucks up some of my notebook styling, but what the hey. Getting there, eh?

 


11 hours 30 sec ago Spot the difference << Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

Mały Brat patrzy
This is yesterday's demonstration in Gdańsk, Poland against the anti-constitutional moves by the current ruling party: in the town where Lech Wałęsa fought the communists, the march started under the Monument to the Fallen Shipyard Workers. The motto of this march was "No to the Breaking of the Constitution!" Participants in the so-called "Marsz Wkurzonych [March of pissed-off]" thus celebrated the 225th anniversary of the Constitution of May 3rd, and at the same time protested the violation of the Constitution by the current ruling party. 



 that's from the independent media...




This is how state-controlled TV censored the news.







This is a bit like the way British archaeologists present metal detecting, no big problem at all, everything fine with the "partnership". The problem is that the picture at the top is the real one, the other three are a manipulated illusion and the Polish public is getting fed up with the lies of the state media (which have lost over three quarters of a million viewers in the past few weeks). The day after tomorrow we plan another massive march ("The Big Blue March"). This looks like it is going to end badly for the nationalist government in the long run - and what about British archaeologists?

11 hours 34 min ago Aerial Photos of Palmyra << Paul Barford (Portable Antiquity Collecting and Heritage Issues)

 Claire Voon, 'Aerial Photos of Palmyra Show Extent of Damage Done by ISIS', Hyper allergic May 4, 2016 The phrase "looters' holes" does not occur anywhere. Umm. the statues in the museum that were thrown down never (in the museum that is) had heads, the first people in were the Polish mission who'd reconstructed them, funny that's another thing that does not get a mention here.

14 hours 10 min ago PhD studentship on Early Greek Alphabet, Cambridge << Current Epigraphy

Posted for Philippa Steele:

The Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge, is pleased to announce a fixed term fully-funded PhD Studentship on the European Research Council funded Project Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS).

Further information is available here:

http://www.classics.cam.ac.uk/Research/projects/contexts-of-and-relations-between-early-writing-systems-crews/phd-studentship-on-the-early-greek-alphabet

Interested parties should read in detail the information given on the page linked to above, which explains the application process. Please note that due to restrictions of funding, the studentship is open to UK/EU nationals only.

For further information on the CREWS project, visit the project blog here:

https://crewsproject.wordpress.com/

14 hours 23 min ago Open Access Journal: Turkish Studies: International Periodical For the Languages, Literature and History of Turkish or Turkic << AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources
 [First posted in AMIR 6 January 2011, updated 5 May 2016]

Turkish Studies: International Periodical For the Languages, Literature and History of Turkish or Turkic
ISSN: 1308-2140
Turkish Studies is a journal publishing academic , scientific and original articles based on research, analysis and assessment. Especially Turkish and English, German, French and Russian articles are published since Turkish Studies is published in the field of Social Sciences. 
Turkish studies , one of the most respected journals in the field of Turcology, is the meeting point for scientists. The most important feature of the journal is the system of guest editorial. 
Scientists leading their fields and achieved success can publish special issues on their professions thanks to the guest editorial system and as a result, reference guides belonging to the related fields are published. 

Thus, both scientists realize their dreams on their own fields and qualifed reference guides on their fields are published. 

Turkish Studies is in touch with great numbers of Turcology Institute all over the world. It has agencies in 30 countries from Norway to Canada. 

Turkish Studies is scanned by tens of indexes and databases. It was established  by the efforts of many scientists connected to different universities. 

Therefore, Turkish Studies is non-aligned to any university or institution and it is maintaining its publishings independently.
31.12.2013
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 11
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 12
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 13

31.03.2014
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 3

31.03.2013
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 3

30.12.2015
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 13
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 14
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 15
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 16

30.12.2014
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 10
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 11
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 12

30.12.2012
Sayı:Volume 7 Issue 4-I
Sayı:Volume 7 Issue 4-II

30.12.2011
Sayı:Volume 6 Issue 4

30.09.2015
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 9
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 10
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 11
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 12

30.09.2014
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 7
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 8
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 9

30.09.2013
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 7
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 8
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 9

30.09.2011
Sayı:Volume 6 Issue 3

30.07.2013
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 4
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 5
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 6

30.06.2015
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 5
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 6
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 7
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 8

30.06.2014
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 4
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 5
Sayı:Volume 9 Issue 6

30.03.2015
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 3
Sayı:Volume 10 Issue 4

2011
Sayı:Volume 6 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 6 Issue 2

2010
Sayı:Volume 5 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 5 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 5 Issue 3
Sayı:Volume 5 Issue 4

2009
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 1-1
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 1-2
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 3
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 4
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 5
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 6
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 7
Sayı:Volume 4 Issue 8

2008
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 3
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 4
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 5
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 6
Sayı:Volume 3 Issue 7

2007
Sayı:Volume 2 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 2 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 2 Issue 3
Sayı:Volume 2 Issue 4

2006
Sayı:Volume 1 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 1 Issue 2

19.09.2012
Sayı:Volume 7 Issue 3

15.03.2012
Sayı:Volume 7 Issue 1

14.12.2013
Sayı:Volume 8 Issue 10

08.06.2012
Sayı:Volume 7 Issue 2

Sayı:Volume 11 Issue 1
Sayı:Volume 11 Issue 2
Sayı:Volume 11 Issue 3
Sayı:Volume 11 Issue 4
Sayı:Volume 11 Issue 5



14 hours 49 min ago Laser scanner e fotografia per il restauro virtuale per la dea di Morgantina del Museo di Aidone << Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

L’Istituo per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali Ibam del CNR, grazie alla collaborazione della direzione del Museo Regionale di Aidone, ha avviato un progetto di studio sulla celebre statua della dea di Morgantina e sui frammenti superstiti al fine di realizzare un restauro virtuale della scultura, considerata una delle opere d’arte più celebri e discusse al mondo.

14 hours 49 min ago Special Issue: Digital Humanities in Ancient Jewish, Christian and Arabic Traditions << AMIR: Access to Mideast and Islamic Resources Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture
ISSN: 2165-9214
Special Issue: Digital Humanities in Ancient Jewish, Christian and Arabic Traditions
Guest Editors: Claire Clivaz, Paul Dilley, David Hamidović, Mladen Popović, Caroline T. Schroeder and Joseph Verheyden

Table of Contents

Introduction

Claire Clivaz
PDF
1-20

Articles

Caroline T. Schroeder
PDF
21-49
F. W. Dobbs-Allsopp, Chris Hooker, Gregory Murray
PDF
50-72
Jan Krans
PDF
73-88
James Allen Libby
PDF
89-135
David Allen Michelson
PDF
136-182
Jeanne-Nicole Mellon Saint-Laurent
PDF
183-204
Giuliano Lancioni, N. Peter Joosse
PDF
205-227
David Joseph Wrisley
PDF
228-257

Book Reviews

Review of "Deconstructing Islamophobia in Poland", by Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska (University of Warsaw, 2014)
Ruth Tsuria
PDF
258-261
Review of "Religion in Science Fiction: The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre", by Steven Hrotic (Bloomsbury, 2014)
Kristin Peterson
PDF
262-265
Review of "Preaching on Wax: The Phonograph and the Shaping of Modern African American Religion", by Lerone Martin (NYU, 2014)
Denis Bekkering
PDF
266-270
Review of "Antagonism on YouTube: Metaphor in Online Discourse", by Stephen Pihlaja (Bloomsbury, 2014)
Amber Michelle Stamper
PDF
271-274
Review of "Silver Screen Buddha: Buddhism in Asian and Western Films", by Sharon Suh (Bloomsbury, 2015)
Giulia Evolvi
PDF
275-278
14 hours 52 min ago Special Issue: Digital Humanities in Ancient Jewish, Christian and Arabic Traditions << Charles Ellwood Jones (AWOL: The Ancient World Online) Journal of Religion, Media and Digital Culture
ISSN: 2165-9214
Special Issue: Digital Humanities in Ancient Jewish, Christian and Arabic Traditions
Guest Editors: Claire Clivaz, Paul Dilley, David Hamidović, Mladen Popović, Caroline T. Schroeder and Joseph Verheyden

Table of Contents

Introduction

Claire Clivaz
PDF
1-20

Articles

Caroline T. Schroeder
PDF
21-49
F. W. Dobbs-Allsopp, Chris Hooker, Gregory Murray
PDF
50-72
Jan Krans
PDF
73-88
James Allen Libby
PDF
89-135
David Allen Michelson
PDF
136-182
Jeanne-Nicole Mellon Saint-Laurent
PDF
183-204
Giuliano Lancioni, N. Peter Joosse
PDF
205-227
David Joseph Wrisley
PDF
228-257

Book Reviews

Review of "Deconstructing Islamophobia in Poland", by Katarzyna Górak-Sosnowska (University of Warsaw, 2014)
Ruth Tsuria
PDF
258-261
Review of "Religion in Science Fiction: The Evolution of an Idea and the Extinction of a Genre", by Steven Hrotic (Bloomsbury, 2014)
Kristin Peterson
PDF
262-265
Review of "Preaching on Wax: The Phonograph and the Shaping of Modern African American Religion", by Lerone Martin (NYU, 2014)
Denis Bekkering
PDF
266-270
Review of "Antagonism on YouTube: Metaphor in Online Discourse", by Stephen Pihlaja (Bloomsbury, 2014)
Amber Michelle Stamper
PDF
271-274
Review of "Silver Screen Buddha: Buddhism in Asian and Western Films", by Sharon Suh (Bloomsbury, 2015)
Giulia Evolvi
PDF
275-278
15 hours 1 min ago Online Archeomatica Numero 1 2016: fruizione, diagnostica, ricerca, allestimenti museali, stampa 3D << Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

Disponibile online gratuitamente il Numero 1 dell'edizione 2016 di Archeomatica - Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali. La copertina di questo numero è dedicata al rilievo mediante tecnica di image based in camera scanner (fotogrammetria 3D) e all’impiego della piattaforma di fruizione QTVR (Quick Time Virtual Reality) per la valorizzazione di superfici pittoriche in ambiente rupestre presentato presentato dall’Università del Salento.

15 hours 12 min ago E is for Epidius << Virginia L. Campbell (Pompeian Connections)

The letter E has been a bit of a dilemma for me – there aren’t many gentilicium that begin with this letter – but there are two that are considered to be families of distinction. What is somewhat remarkable about both of them – the Epidii and the Eumachii  – is that they have a reputation for importance in Pompeian scholarship, yet the evidence is actually somewhat scarce, but in different ways. The Eumachii are known almost entirely because of one person, whereas the Epidii are known primarily from a single place – the family burial plot. The idiosyncratic nature of the evidence for the evidence thus made me decide to derive from form and write about both.

The Epidii are one of the families of what are typically termed ‘indigenous’ Pompeians – that is – their presence in Pompeii pre-dates the time of Roman colonisation in 80 BC. There is some connection between the family name and a god of the river Sarnus. Members of the family are attested in the Sabellian period in some Oscan inscriptions. Castrén claims, somewhat dubiously, twenty-nine individuals that belong to the gens Epidia. (A number of these names are only partially recorded in the witness lists of the tablets of Iucundus, and thus there could be some duplication in Castrén’s prosopography). The most well known member of the family is Marcus Epidius Sabinus, who was a magistrate in the Flavian period. There are numerous dipinti supporting his campaigns for both aedile (which he won) and later for duovir. What is noteworthy about his electoral programmata is the inclusion of an endorsement of an agent of the emperor Vespasian in six of his notices.

CIL IV 768 = ILS 6438d
M(arcum) Epidium Sabinum d(uumvirum) i(ure) dic(undo) o(ro) v(os) f(aciatis) dig(nus) est / defensorem coloniae ex sententia Suedi Clementis sancti iudicis / consensu ordinis ob merita eius et probitatem dignum rei publicae faciat / Sabinus dissignator cum Plausu facit.
‘I beg you to elect Marcus Epidius Sabinus duovir with judicial powers, he is worthy. May you elect one who is a protector of the colony according to the opinion of Suedius Clemens, the worshipful judge, and by agreement of the council on account of his merits and his honesty, worthy of public office. Sabinus, the theatre official, elects him with applause.’

There are at least ten different freedmen whose names appear in the wax tablets of Iucundus that belong to the gens Epidia. This in itself is a testament to the apparent size of the family: the tablets are dated to a decade from the 50s to 60s AD, so document a fairly short period of time in which there were ten or more male freedmen of sufficient status to serve as witnesses to financial transactions. None of these men are attested anywhere else in the epigraphic record except Marcus Epidius Hymenaeus, who also appears in electoral notices as a rogator (CIL IV 7509, 7692) and has recorded his name on the walls of the city (CIL IV 9517, 9518.1-5).

What is particularly striking about this family, however, is their funerary evidence. In the early twentieth century, an area was found approximately five hundred meters from the Porta di Stabia, which upon excavation, revealed the burials of more than one hundred and sixty individuals, believed to all be members of the Epidii family. Known as Fondo Azzolini, this four hundred square meter area features two types of burial: inhumation and cremation. Forty-four of the burials are relatively simple interments of corpses in stone lined graves, following the tradition of pre-Roman burial typical of the Samnite period. The remainder consist of burial of urns containing cremated remains, the use of terracotta libations tubes, and grave markers in the form of columellae. Made primarily of tufa and limestone, they are fairly rough in design in comparison to the marble variants found in the city, and many of them are inscribed. In his publication on the original excavation, Matteo Della Corte (NSA 1916: 287-309) recorded funerary epitaphs on thirty-two of the Roman era burials.

image004

Like so many of those whose name appear as witnesses on the wax tablets, those recorded in the funerary inscriptions are unattested elsewhere in Pompeii. However, based on the nomenclature, the majority appear to belong to slaves, women, and freedmen, so it probably is little surprise that these individuals are otherwise unknown. What this does, though, is clearly illustrate the extended nature of the Roman family. Many also record their ages, which is not unusual in practice, particularly for those who die young, but is nevertheless disproportionately high in occurrence in comparison to other burial areas in Pompeii. Some examples:

NSA 1916: 302.4
M(arcus) Epidius / Monimus / vix(it) ann(is) XXX.
‘Marcus Epidius Monimus lived thirty years.’

NSA 1916: 302.7b
Livia Calliope / v(ixit) ann(is) XXX.
‘Livia Calliope lived thirty years.’

NSA 1916: 303.23
Liberalis / vixit XVII / annis.
‘Liberalis lived seventeen years.’

NSA 1916: 303.66
M(arcus) Epidius / Dioscorus.
‘Marcus Epidius Dioscourus.’

NSA 1916: 303.110
Epidiae / Veneriae.
‘To Epidia Veneria.’

Ultimately, what I find fascinating about the Epidii, is that unlike many of the other prominent families of Pompeii, far more epigraphic evidence survives for the freedmen and slaves of the family than for the men who would have served as owners and patrons. Because so many are to be found in the family’s burial area, it begs the question whether the more elite members of the family were also interred therein, or have the monumental tomb that would be expected of those of their status elsewhere. The fact that Marcus Epidius Sabinus, when running for office, is the sole evidence of support coming from an external magistrate, much less one in the employ of the emperor, suggests that this was a family to be reckoned with. That they had power and prestige is clear, as is the wealth they must have possessed as demonstrated by the number of slaves and freedmen attested. That they are so unobtrusive in the epigraphic record is an anomaly in comparison to other magisterial families.  I, of course, want to know why. Short of finding another tomb or burial area (hang on, I’ll get my trowel!) I’m afraid we’ll never know.

 

 


Tagged: Alphabet, CIL, Dipinti, Epigraphy, Freedmen, Names, Networks, Pompeii, Slaves, Tombs, Wax Tablets, Women
15 hours 29 min ago Archeomatica 1 2016 << Archeomatica: Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali

 

   
PUOI RICEVERLO IN SPEDIZIONE CARTACEA O DOWNLOAD DIGITALE 
 
 
 
UNA PREVIEW ON-LINE E' DISPONIBILE A 
 

 

 

Disponibile online gratuitamente il Numero 1 dell'edizione 2016 di Archeomatica - Tecnologie per i Beni Culturali. La copertina di questo numero è dedicata al rilievo mediante tecnica di image based in camera scanner (fotogrammetria 3D) e all’impiego della piattaforma di fruizione QTVR (Quick Time Virtual Reality) per la valorizzazione di superfici pittoriche in ambiente rupestre presentato presentato dall’Università del Salento.

Il numero si apre con l'editoriale del Direttore Renzo Carlucci "Dalla scomposizione della realtà alla memoria digitale preventiva" per promuovere la "memoria digitale preventiva" affinché, partendo dalla presa di coscienza della perdita e distruzione del patrimonio culturale mondiale a causa di catastrofi naturali o di interventi antropici, ci si possa dotare di archivi digitali, accessibili, utili alla conoscenza e conservazione del patrimonio, in modo tale che, almeno la memoria digitale non venga distrutta.

In questo numero trovano spazio tante tecnologie: dalle strumentazioni per la diagnostica e il restauro di opere d’arte alle nuove tecnologie di valorizzazione e conoscenza del patrimonio culturale, comprese le soluzioni multimediali per i musei, fino alla stampa 3D.

L'l’Istituto per i Beni Archeologici e Monumentali del Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (IBAM CNR) descrive le attività di ricerca che hanno portato alla progettazione del Catania Living Lab, nuovo spazio per permettere al grande pubblico di accedere a contenuti di ricerca. L’iniziativa  è nata dalla volontà di valorizzare il patrimonio culturale mediante la digitalizzazione e lo storytelling emozionale. Il tutto nell'ambito di un progetto dedicato a innovare e reinterpretare la città storica in un ottica di città intelligente, ovvero di “Smart City”.
La sezione "Musei e Fruizione" è dedicata anche al recente riallestimento del Museo Dinamico del Castello dei Vicari, ad opera di Space Spa, dove sono state impiegate diverse tecnologie multimediali per comunicare la storia dell'antico vicariato toscano e delle origine etrusche ed accompagnare e coinvolgere il visitatore mediante la voce dei protagonisti storici.
Prosegue la serie di articoli dedicati ai Laboratori del CNR che si occupano di tecnologie per i beni culturali: in questo numero l'Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara" di Firenze presenta le tecnologie che negli anni ha messo a punto per la diagnostica dei beni culturali e l'archeometria quali la spettroscopia di riflettanza e l'imaging iperspettrale, la microscopia digitale 3D portatile o tecnologie per la pulitura di monumenti ed opere d'arte basate sulla tecnologia laser.
Un articolo illustra una recente applicazione di rilievo laser scanning e prototipazione rapida su un mosaico a tecnica bizantina.
Nella sezione "Rivelazioni" vengono presentati sia i risultati delle indagini conoscitive sul celebre Retablo del Maestro di Castelsardo compiute dall'Università degli Studi di Cagliari, il Centro Ricerche Casaccia di ENEA e la Soprintendenza Belle Arti e Paesaggio per le Province di Sassari e Nuoro.
Anche l'Annunciazione “ritrovata” a Nunziata di Mascali è stata sottoposta ad alcune indagini diagnostiche che hanno rivelano alcuni particolari insoliti nella rappresentazione tradizionale evangelica. Le analisi sono state effettuate da un team di professionisti composto da Cultural Heritage Science Open Source, il Laboratorio Restauri Calvagna Giovanni e  alcuni ricercatori del Department of Photonics Engineering della Technical University of Denmark.

 

In questo numero:

EDITORIALE
Dalla scomposizione della realtà alla memoria digitale preventiva
di Renzo Carlucci

DOCUMENTAZIONE
Dal rilievo in Camera-scanner alla piattaforma di fruizione QTVR-based stereoscopica. Metodologie integrate per il monitoraggio e la valorizzazione delle superfici pittoriche in ambiente rupestre
di Massimo Limoncelli e Claudio Germinario

MUSEI E FRUIZIONE
Il Catania Living Lab di Cultura e Tecnologia. Quando la ricerca scientifica incontra il grande pubblico
di Daniele Malfitana, Licia Cutroni, Andrea Guardo, Claudia Pantellaro, Giusi Meli e Silvia Iachello

Il Museo Dinamico del Castello dei Vicari, una visita immersiva tra multimedia, narrazioni ed emozioni
di Benedetta Masolini

LABORATORI
L’Istituto di Fisica Applicata “Nello Carrara”. Ricerca, sviluppo e innovazione nell’archeometria e nella conservazione
di Salvatore Siano, Roberto Olmi, Marcello Picollo, Valentina Raimondi e Roberto Pini

RESTAURO
Le tecniche geomatiche a supporto dei Beni Culturali. Digitalizzazione e stampa 3D di un mosaico a tecnica bizantina a scopo documentativo e conservativo
di Riccardo Rivola, Cristina Castagnetti, Eleonora Bertacchini e Francesca Casagrande

RIVELAZIONI
Indagini conoscitive sul retablo di Castelsardo, caposaldo del tardogotico catalano in Sardegna
di M. Carboni, G. Carcangiu, O. Cocco, L. Donati, P. Meloni, P. Moioli, F. Persia, C. Seccaroni, M. Serci, L. Solla, A. Tognacci e P. Usai

L’Annunciazione ritrovata. Nunziata di Mascali, Sicilia
di Antonino Cosentino, Giovanni Calvagna, Giuseppe Calvagna, Carmelo Calvagna, Corinna L. Koch Dandolo e Peter Uhd Jepsen

 

RUBRICHE: AGORÀ, AZIENDE E PRODOTTI, EVENTI

 

È possibile abbonarsi alla rivista in formato cartaceo e digitale su www.geo4all.it

 

 

I singoli articoli saranno presto disponibili per gli autori in Open Access QUI

 

 

15 hours 31 min ago S. Weigert, Hebraica veritas << Compitum - publications

weigert.jpg

Sebastian Weigert, Hebraica veritas. Übersetzungsprinzipien und Quellen der Deuteronomiumübersetzung des Hieronymus, Stuttgart, 2016.

Éditeur : W. Kohlhammer
Collection : Beiträge zur Wissenschaft vom Alten und Neuen Testament, Elfte Folge, 217
280 pages
ISBN : 978-3-17-030381-2
89 €


Gegen Ende des 4. Jahrhunderts unternahm es der Kirchenvater Hieronymus - erstmals in der Geschichte des lateinischsprachigen Christentums - die Schriften des Alten Testaments aus dem Hebräischen, der hebraica veritas, zu übersetzen. Nach eigenem Zeugnis nimmt er dabei Anleihen bei der Septuaginta und den hexaplarischen Übersetzungen (Aquila, Symmachus und Theodotion); weiterhin lässt er sich von jüdischen Gelehrten über philologische und exegetische Traditionen informieren. Weigert vergleicht den lateinischen Text des Buchs Deuteronomium mit den genannten Quellen sowie mit zeitgenössischer jüdischer Literatur (Targumim, Midraschim), um zu erhellen, von welchen Prinzipien sich Hieronymus beim Übersetzen leiten lässt und aus welchen Quellen er schöpft, um sich der hebraica veritas zu nähern.


Source : W. Kohlhammer

16 hours 2 min ago Have archaeologists found the remains of the site where William Wallace was made Guardian of Scotland? << Archaeological News on Tumblr Archaeologists believe they can “almost pinpoint” the Scottish Borders spot where William Wallace,...
16 hours 33 min ago ASOR Cultural Heritage Initiatives Weekly Report 85–86 (March 16, 2016 – March 29, 2016) << ASOR Syrian Heritage Initiative

wr085-086_1100x200

AUTHORS

Michael D. Danti, Amr al-Azm, Allison Cuneo, Susan Penacho, Bijan Rouhani, Marina Gabriel, Kyra Kaercher, and Jamie O’Connell

Download Report 85–86


Key points from this report:

  • SARG and Russian forces capture Palmyra from ISIL militants, providing the most comprehensive photographic documentation of the historic site and its museum since the ISIL occupation started in May 2015 (ASOR CHI Incident Report SHI 16-0041, SHI 16-0042, and SHI 16-0043).
  • The Uthman bin Affan Mosque and Bilal ibn Rabia Mosque in Tadmor, Homs Governorate was damaged, reportedly by Russian airstrikes (ASOR CHI Incident Report SHI 16-0039).
  • Two sites in the city of Raqqa, a market near Hattin Cemetery and an area near al-Imam al-Nawawi Mosque, were damaged reportedly by Russian airstrikes (ASOR CHI Incident Report SHI 16-0038).
  • The al-Sayyida Aisha Mosque in the city of Aleppo, Aleppo Governorate was damaged reportedly by Russian airstrikes (ASOR CHI Incident Report SHI 16-0040).
  • Reportedly damage the Al Aisha Mosque in Mosul, Ninawa Governorate reportedly by US-led Coalition airstrikes (ASOR CHI Incident Report IHI 16-0009).

* This report is based on research conducted by the “Syria Preservation Initiative: Planning for Safeguarding Heritage Sites in Syria." Weekly reports reflect reporting from a variety of sources and may contain unverified material. As such, they should be treated as preliminary and subject to change.

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16 hours 47 min ago The book title of book titles << Farrago MacDonell's A Sanskrit Grammar for Students (Oxford, 1927: xiv) refers to a work called gaa-ratna-maho-dadhi 'the ocean of the gems of word-groups' by Vardhamāna in 1140.





This title surely puts the Thesaurus Linguae Latinae or Linguae Graecae to shame and in the shade.
 In relation to ratna, recall, from the first stanza of the first Vedic hymn to Agni (RV 1.1), ratna-dhā_tama(m) 'best bestower of ratna ('treasure')'. There are no IE cognates for ratna.
17 hours 19 min ago Some Cats are Gods (An Atheist Confesses) << James F. McGrath (Exploring Our Matrix) Ipreviously pointed out that, if atheism means denying the existence of any being that is believed by some humans to be divine, then the existence of cats disproves atheism. Hemant Mehta seems to have seen the light, since he posted the image below under a title acknowledging that “some cats are gods”:
17 hours 31 min ago Major grant for the Early Manuscripts Electronic Library << Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com) <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/R-ECkGHPEDA" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
17 hours 43 min ago Mysterious ancient smears << Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com) <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/6OlBNG1ajgI" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>
17 hours 49 min ago David at Dura-Europos << Jim Davila (Paleojudaica.com) <img src="http://feeds.feedburner.com/~r/blogspot/ABNx/~4/CgIMjx1URwU" height="1" width="1" alt=""/>